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1998 Forum Archive - Training D

RunCoach Forums 1998 Archive - Training D

running and cycling equivalent

From: JDS
Category: General
Date: 8/28/98
Time: 7:24:02 AM
Remote Name: 152.163.201.198

Comments

I do alot of cycling to recover from hard workouts. I've looked everywhere for cycling intensity via speed, or rpm that would a equivalent run mileage. Do you or anyone know of such a conversion formula? I realize it will not be directly accurate, I'm just looking for something in the ballpark to set a more accurate training scheduel...

Thanks John

Re: running and cycling equivalent

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 8/30/98
Time: 11:37:09 PM
Remote Name: 203.8.223.2

Comments

Hi John,

There are several ways to try and work out equivalent biking and running workouts.

The best way is to use a heart rate monitor. This will give a good indication of the intensity of the workout independent of which muscles are being used. So if you are exersizing at say 150bpm on the bike then that pace will be equivalent to a 150bpm pace on the run. (The HRM will also take into account the relative strengths and weaknesses of the muscles groups)

Another method is to use Mets. The met is used to compare the energy (oxygen-burning) demands of one level of intensity of asctivity to that of another for the same person. At rest we all take in between 3.5 and 4.0 millilitres of oxygen per klilogram of body weight per minute. The multiple of this amount that you use at higher intensity is your met. There are a variety of tables for each sport that you can use.

Finally as an approximation I have often used a 3 to 1 formula. 3 miles on the bike is equivalent to 2 mile on the run. This is a very rough guide and is dependent on you relative strengths, the terrain, wind and the type of bike.

Hope the above helps,

Paul

Re: running and cycling equivalent

From: John
Category: General
Date: 8/31/98
Time: 1:19:55 PM
Remote Name: 152.163.201.199

Comments

Thanks Paul,

it does help. I often thought of the 3 to 1 ratio but was unsure. I have used the heart monitor on occasion. Just to give you some feedback, I have to work really hard to get the same training heart rate that I use in training. So i think the 3 to 1 is better suited for me.


Losing Muscle Bulk

From: Kris Riordan
Category: Coach
Date: 8/30/98
Time: 11:22:00 PM
Remote Name: 203.8.223.2

Comments

Hi,

I recently engaged in a weights program in hope of running faster but found that became to bulky.

How is it possible to lose muscle bulk safely?

Regards

Kris Riordan

Re: Losing Muscle Bulk

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 8/30/98
Time: 11:40:05 PM
Remote Name: 203.8.223.2

Comments

Kris,

The use of a weights program to improve performance in distance runners is open to some debate. Some experts claim it helps whilst others say it has no value. I have used weights programs before focussing on the upper body body to balance the runners lower body development. It probably had no effect on performance but didn't detract either. If you do ues a weights program then high repetition (12-20 repeats) with lighter weights is optimum.

It is possible to loose muscle bulk by by running more miles and eliminating strength training from your program. The body soon adapts to the training load it is subjected to. If you stop the weight training and focus on running then your muscles will soon re-adapt to running trim. Hill running and interval training are usually all that you need to improve strength in running related muscle groups.

Hope the above helps,

Paul


Creatine

From: Mitch Dawson
Category: Coach
Date: 8/31/98
Time: 12:35:01 PM
Remote Name: 205.188.193.176

Comments

I just got out of the Army where we ran about every day...

I haven't been running for about 2 months now and want to start again.. I have heard about Creatine Monohydrat helping in running. Is theremuch of a benifit from this... I want to take somethig that might help to "get back into the groove" Would this help. Heard also that taking Chromium with it may help... Thanks..

Re: Creatine

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 9/1/98
Time: 11:14:56 PM
Remote Name: 203.14.174.2

Comments

Mitch,

I am not a believer in adding much to an already healthy diet. So the best advice is to have a good diet, start slowly, and include rest days.

If however you wish to supplement with creatine and chromium then here is some general advice.

Creatine

Creatine is used by muscle cells to form creatine phosphate, a chemical which is used to create energy for short fast efforts. If also acts as a buffer which reduces acidity during exersize. It has been shown to improve strength in muscles and this can translate into improved performances but mostly for the shorter distances. You should also take it with carbohydrate. Typical creatine doses are 20g per day for boosting with 4-5 grams per day to maintain.

Chromium

The effects of chromium have been studied much less. It may improve muscle mass and may reduce fat storage. It also may improve recovery by boosting protein contruction in muscle cells. Much of the research is not conclusive in this area. Actual dosage can vary. Some experts have recommended not exceeding 200mcg per day to avoid toxicity. Others have indicated that much higher levels are okay.

Hope the above helps

Paul


Peter Clark's Sciatica

From: Jean-Noel Marchalot
Category: Coach
Date: 9/4/98
Time: 4:59:06 AM
Remote Name: 143.209.18.206

Comments

Peter,

I am reading your post only today, and I realized that you might suffer from the same problem I had after running the New York Marathon last year. I ran the Marathon in spite of a minor calf injury which seems to have created some kind of imbalance in my hips. This inflamed the whole sciatic nerve to the point I could not run any longer.

My acupuncture doctor correctly identified the problem as an inflamation of the piriformis muscle (just behind the glutes). The nerve runs through that muscle, and gets compressed and inflamed when the muscle is irritated.

What seems to have really cured it was the stretching sessions I started doing after finding some good pages on the subject on the Web. If you still suffer, try this, for up to 1 minute (it worked very well for me):

- Place the right knee on the ground roughly in line with your left shoulder The right foot should be just in front of the left knee

- Press your hips towards the ground so that your bodyweight is on your right leg.

- As you move down the right knee comes closer to the left shoulder. You should feel a gentle pull deep in the right hip / buttocks.

I have more information on it, but I think it comes from a Web site called the Medical Tent. Let me know if you need more.

Good luck,

Jean-Noel

Re: Peter Clark's Sciatica

From: Peter Clark
Category: Coach
Date: 9/6/98
Time: 12:34:21 AM
Remote Name: 139.142.70.249

Comments

Jean- Noel I appreciate your comments and have, it appears, the problem you describe. I have been stretching the periformis muscle and am now back running every other day or so and have got my running time up to an hour or so. The stretch you describe sounds good and will give it a try! Thanks again!

Peter


Starting a Race

From: Michelle -14
Category: General
Date: 9/6/98
Time: 12:06:27 PM
Remote Name: 208.158.59.68

Comments

At the begining of the race how should I start? And should I run with one of my team mates or someone else? And should I try to encourage my team mates to run with me?

Thanx for the help!!

-Michelle

Re: Starting a Race

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 9/7/98
Time: 10:53:53 PM
Remote Name: 203.59.0.82

Comments

Hi Michelle,

It is great that you are running but just remember that whether you win or lose you should be having fun.

Race strategy can be hard but I will give you a couple of pointers. There are two main factors that determine your strategy:- race distance and whether you want a PB or to win.

Assuming that you are racing in a distance event then to achieve a PB you would try and race at an even pace the whole way. This seems like starting slow and finishing fast. If you want to win then even pacing may not be the best and your strategy will depend on your strengths and weaknesses compared with your opposition.

For a more detailed explanation look at this discussion database article : http://www.sportscoach.com.au/runcoachdiscus/_disc1/00000098.htm

You can often use your friends and team mates to help you run faster. Sticking with someone who is slightly faster than you can often lead you to a new PB. Encouraging slightly slower team mates to stay with can often help them as well. If you are a long way apart in ability then sticking together will not help either of you too much.

Also if you just run for a social activity, not to win or loose, then running in a group can be very enjoyable.

All the best,

Paul


Children and Running

From: Jake Grantham
Category: General
Date: 9/7/98
Time: 8:52:55 AM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Hi.

How are you?? Well another person and I are starting on are on pretty much a cross country camp for kids ranging from 2nd grade to 7th grade...

I am just asking for any information or webpages that could help me determine the degree of diffuculty of running for that age group....any information would be very appreciated....

sincerely,

Jake Grantham

Re: Children and Running

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 9/7/98
Time: 9:02:06 AM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Jake,

I am not an expert on children's running but can give you some general advice. The first thing is that it is important that the running be fun and not very competitive. This will improve the enjoyment and hopefully lead to a lifetime of running. Secondly depending on where you are children have less tolerence to heat. They produce proportionately more body heat during exersize and have a lower sweating capacity and heat transfer than adults. If it is hot then limit the exersize to 30 mins or less.

Here is some guidelines for age groups

6-10 years: focus mainly on games with running a by product of the fun. Racing should be limited.

11-14 years: you can start teaching the children the proper techniques and principles of running. You can start to include 'training' focussing on sprinting and longer recovery jogs

15-18 years: in these years children can adapt to training loads of a half to three quarters of an adult. They are mentally and physically ready for relatively intense competition.

Although the race distances are shorter for children and will vary depending on each child here is a guide for the maximum distance:

8-11 years: 5 km (3 miles)

12-13 years: 10km (6 miles)

14-15 years: 15km (10 miles)

16-17 years: 32km (20 miles)

Hope the above helps,

Paul


Maximum Heart rate

From: Joe Rosenfels
Category: Coach
Date: 9/8/98
Time: 11:29:00 PM
Remote Name: 203.14.174.2

Comments

Paul,

My questions relates to maximum heart rate.

I found that before I had a heart rate monitor I would get headaches after interval training or races. Being 41 I have now set the max to 180 and dont have headaches any more. The only affect is that when I race I hold back slighthly to keep under 180 and this results in a slower time.

What is the physical effect of exceeding your maximum heart rate?

Regards,

Joe

Re: Maximum Heart rate

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 9/8/98
Time: 11:32:56 PM
Remote Name: 203.14.174.2

Comments

Joe,

You can't actually exceed your maximum heart (by definition). You can however exceed you maximum predicted heart rate. This just means that you predicted maximum is incorrect. Predictions will always be slightly wrong for most people and way out for some so it is always better to do a max heart rate test.

If you have a heart rate monitor then doing a test is quite simple (but intense). If you are not used to interval sessions then get a medical check before doing such a test if you are over 40 years old. A reasonable way to do it is after a 10 min warm-up and some run throughs do 2 times 3 minute hard intervals with 2 minutes rest in between. The maximum pulse your HRM measures during this time will be close to your maimum. If you where a HRM during normal interval sessions then keep a watch on it as you might get a reasonable indication there as well.

Training will also effect your maximum. The first few years of training will increase your heart's stroke volume and the extra effort may actually decrease your maximum pulse slightly. If you continue to train (especially intervals) then over the next few years your maximum will will drift up again as you get used to increased blood flow. So people who have trained for many years will often have a higher maximum pulse than the predictions from formulas developed for sedentary people. With age, of course, your maximum pulse will also decrease.

I sometimes get slight headaches after intense training sessions but am not sure of the physical cause. If I find out I will let you know.

Hope the above helps,

Paul


Diet

From: Monique
Category: General
Date: 9/18/98
Time: 9:06:51 AM
Remote Name: 128.148.183.205

Comments

I am a sprinter and after a year of being injured feel like I am a little overweight. What would be the best diet for me: such as should I eat more Protein right now than Carbos? Or what would you recommend? I am in pre-season training right now and by the time the season comes into full swing I would like to lose some weight. In addition what would be the longest distance you would recommend a 400 runner to run during pre-season training in order to get good endurance, but not totally kill those fast twitch muscles?

Re: Diet

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 9/18/98
Time: 9:52:49 AM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Monique,

Diet

Diet is an overrated area and you will get as many answers from as many people that you ask. The best thing is to maintain a balanced diet which includes fresh fruit and vegetables. For people who run it is important to replenish your carbohydrates. If you exersize for over 2 hours a day then you would need to increase the percentage carbos to above 40%, but for less exersize time then around 40% is fine. I wouldn't worry about protein intake unless you are a vegetarian. If you run alot then up to 1.8g per kilo per day may be required. Most people already get this much.

Pre-Season

Although I believe in periodization I don't believe in eliminating fast sessions during pre-season or base building phases. It is not how far you run but rather the type of runs that you do. You need to ensure that your Fast Twitch Type IIb fibres are used. So although you need to focus on building fitness make sure that you do some faster sessions (eg fartlek or hill sessions or even intervals) during the pre-season. Don't focus on these but try and mix up the pre-season with some faster run-for-fun sessions. Say once per week. In this way you will be better prepared when the season starts in earnest.

Regards

Paul


General questions

From: Michael Maher
Category: General
Date: 9/23/98
Time: 11:06:00 PM
Remote Name: 203.7.198.4

Comments

Paul, Thanks for Runcoach, I am currently evaluating it and feeling inspired to change from my current "unscientific 3-4 runs per week".

Just a couple of questions:

1. What exactly is the "form run"? Is this a threshold run, or is it intended to a slower run with interval style accelerations to the suggested heart rate?

2. How do you calculate the lactate threshold, or is this just assumed to be at a certain percentage of HRmax? As you improve, does the threshold remain at the same heart rate while you manage to run faster without exceeding the threshold? Or does the threshold increase?

3. Finally, I race(orienteering) on very hilly courses, how does this change the training plan? At the moment I tend to train on hilly terrain, which sort of has its on "intervals" built in - should I run more on the flat?

Sorry about so many questions, I feel a little ignorant.

Thanks for your help,

Michael

Re: General questions

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 9/24/98
Time: 6:30:50 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Michael,

Running for fun is the most important thing. Often varying your runs, like RunCoach suggests, can make it more interesting and if it improves your ability then even better!

1. A form run is a run when you mostly focus on your running style. This is where you consiously think about how you are running. Trying to eliminate upward movements, low heel kick, upright body stance, heel-toe, forward/backward arm motions etc. Running easily and flowing. Each run just pick one aspect and try and improve it. During other runs you can also think about style and efficiency but in the form run you focus on it.

2. Lactate threshold or turning point can be calculated a variety of ways. The Conconi test with a heart rate monitor is probably the easiest way for you. Here are some URLs that will help:

http://www.brianmac.demon.co.uk/coni.htm

http://www.rice.edu/~jenky/sports/anaerobic.threshold.html

As you improve your lactate threshold will improve from an untrained level of around 50-60% through to above 90% in well trained athletes. Your VO2max will also improve, though to a lesser extent, (say up to 15-20%).

3. Training should to a great extent simulate the race environment. This means that if you race in hills then training in hills is important. You use slightly different muscles on the flat, uphill and downhill. The running surface can also vary quite considerably in orienteering. You can swap interval sessions in RunCoach for Hill repeats if you like. Have the uphill time similiar to the interval on time. This means that you should focus on the hills but also include some flat.

Hope the above helps,

Paul


Side Stitch (pain)

From: Fred
Category: General
Date: 9/30/98
Time: 9:29:18 AM
Remote Name: 209.186.56.145

Comments

I'm experiencing ( I've been told) side stitch. Pain in the right side above the belt line, after I've been running for a half mile or so. What can I do to aviod it ? It hurts, it slows my pace and wears me down.

Re: Side Stitch (pain)

From: Paul Shields
Category: General
Date: 10/2/98
Time: 8:38:02 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Fred,

Side Stitch can be a terribly frustrating problem. Here are some brief guidelines to help you out.

They are usually caused by cramps in your diaphragm, gas build-up in the intestines or food in the stomach. Stitches mostly occur during hard runs or races.

When you get a stitch on your right side slow down for a minute or so and breathe out hard when your left foot strikes the ground. If the stitch is on your left, exhale hard when your right foot hits. If this doesn't work, try slow, deep breathes expanding your lungs into your stomach cavity or run with your hands on top of your head, elbows back inhaling deeply from your belly.

Something else that works for a few people is to make a fist and push it under your ribcage, press the fist with your free arm and bend your body over at right angles. Run like this for a few steps. This stretches the diaphragm, and most stitches are caused by a spasm of the diaphragm. If none of these methods work, stop and walk until the pain stops.

Also, in case it is caused by food, try not to eat before you run.

Hope the above helps,

Paul

Re: Side Stitch (pain)

From: Reinhard Schroeder
Category: General
Date: 10/15/98
Time: 4:24:51 AM
Remote Name: 194.25.2.165

Comments

Hallo Paul,

I should have read your explanations concerning side stitch a little bit earlier !

I had a very painful experience with that subject last weekend. I did the Marathon in Graz (Austria) and had side stitch more or less from the very beginning. I did not know how to get rid of it and I did exactly the wrong thing namely inhaling more deaply instead of exhaling. The pain was not so severe to force me immediately out of the race but it accompanied me all the rest of the race.

At the half marathon distance I was 5 minutes behind my time schedule and I started to feel tired. At 30 km I was 10 minutes behind schedule and 5 minutes slower than in my training run over the same distance ten days before (where I felt great at that point). At 32 km I was exhausted and I gave up the race.

I was very disappointed because half a year of training was in vain. Now I'm looking for the reasons and the question is: Can side stitch affect the runners performance in such a dramatical way ? I can't think of other reasons right now.

And what is the biophysical reason for that ? A theory I'm thinking of is, that the air which is not completely exhaled from the lungs has a higher concentration of carbon dioxide which reduces the processing of oxygen in the lungs. May be comparable to a car running with a mixture between gasoline and water.

May be somebody knows more about this subject.

Reinhard


Training for Pikes Peak

From: Nikeboy
Category: General
Date: 10/1/98
Time: 9:24:45 AM
Remote Name: 204.68.210.62

Comments

I'm thinking of training for the Pikes Peak ascent. I live in the San Francisco Bay area and can get in about 2,000 to 3,000 feet of climbing before having to descend and all of it is at sea level to 3,000 feet. I've heard that there are some problems above 10,000 feet with pounding headaches due to lack of oxygen. The race info says to train for the event as if it were a marathon. I can go to Lake Tahoe for weekends to train which is at 7,000 feet to 10,000 feet. I can not go to the race until the week before. Any Ideas

Re: Training for Pikes Peak

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 10/2/98
Time: 8:54:08 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Hi,

As you probably know the best way to train for an event is to train in the same conditions as the event. This is the same for altitude although some recent research has suggested training in low altitudes and living in high altidues may be the best.

Your VO2max will decrease as you go higher and even if acclimatised it will be much more difficult on your body. Make sure that you are as trained as possible. Elevated VO2max and AT's can only help in warding off the effects of altitude. Training like you were going in a marathon is very useful advice.

If you want to pay money and are near to someone who can provide hypoxic training then this may be an alternative. Hypoxic training is basicaly done in reduced oxgen environments.

Here are some pointers to articles on the Web that can provide more detailed information.

http://www.rice.edu/~jenky/sports/altitude.html

http://www.usatoday.com/olympics/otf/otfgr.htm

http://www.altitudetraining.com/physio.htm

http://www.hypoxico.com/12.html

Finally be sure the the week before the race that you are at elevation make sure you take it easy, drink plenty of water and have a high carbohydrate diet.

Regards

Paul


Ankle fracture ..

From: srsbustamante@hotmail.com
Category: General
Date: 10/15/98
Time: 8:23:58 AM
Remote Name: 195.44.0.224

Comments

HI there

I recently fractured my ankle.. am very active usually and am wondering how long it should be before i can be running again. I wonder if anyone would know. I have a simple closed fracture..could anyone highlight what is likely to be involved ?

I am three weeks since the injury and am to have my plaster removed in three weeks time. Cant seem to get any light on how long it should be till I can walk/run ?

Also ..there is a certain amount of swelling if I have my foot down....how long is the swelling likely to continue ? I feel rather in the dark.. does anyone else out there have an ankle fracture ? can anyone shed some light..i'd appreciate it

thanks

Sofia

Re: Ankle fracture ..

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 10/19/98
Time: 10:33:14 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Sofia,

I am not a doctor and have not had an ankle fracture but can give you a few pointers. Firstly the ankle and foot involes a large group of bones that undergo so quite complex series of movements. This would mean that recovery time would vary depending on the type and severity of the fracture.

There are also two main types of ankle fracture. One is where one of the ankle bones breaks. The other is called an avulsion fracture and is where a ligament pulls a part of the bone off. An Xray will help to tell the difference.

I can't tell you exactly how long you will not be able to use it fully but general advice would be to build slowly (over a few weeks) and back off at any sign of pain.

Here are some websites that may help you with more information.

http://www.biz1.com/foot-leg/brochures/ANKLEFR.html

http://www.panix.com/~tonto1/rehab.html

http://www.health-net.com/ankinj.htm

http://www.physsportsmed.com/issues/sep_96/thordar.htm

http://www.physsportsmed.com/issues/oct_96/thordar2.htm

All the best,

Paul


Running for Beginners

From: Ali Amiri (aamiri@ivey.uwo.ca)
Category: Coach
Date: 10/20/98
Time: 1:32:14 AM
Remote Name: 209.103.15.163

Comments

Can you advise me on how to get started? I have never run on a regular basis.

Ali

Re: Running for Beginners

From: Paul Shields
Category: General
Date: 10/20/98
Time: 7:36:06 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Ali,

It is good that you are running. It is a great pastime. The main thing when you are starting out is to take it easy and only increase the distance/time that you are running gradually. It is often easy with a new activity to get too keen and do too much too soon :-)

Depending on how old you are and your physical condition it is also wise to get a medical check-up before embarking on any new sporting activity.

A good way to start is to alternate run/walk cycles. The main thing is to slowly build up the time on your legs. Don't feel that you must try and run the whole time. Keep going with run/walk regime till you are up too 45 mins or so, then start trying to increase the length of the run parts. Soon you will be running the whole way.

You can use RunCoach to develop a beginning running program. Just use the default settings and it will start off on an easy schedule which has you running on alternate days.

Here are some websites with some more detailed information. There are even complete day by day programs.

http://www.coolrunning.com/major/97/training/5k/glen0.htm

http://www.teamoregon.com/~teamore/publications/begwk1.html

Hope the above helps and that you can stick with running as it is a great pastime.

Regards

Paul

http://www.runnersworld.com/brg/home.html

http://www.runnersworld.com/beginrun/1ststeps.html


Quadriceps

From: 3h30min
Category: General
Date: 10/20/98
Time: 3:26:33 AM
Remote Name: 195.67.250.243

Comments

Hi Paul, can you maybe answer this. Some weeks or so after I started with tempo runs and interval runs I slowly developed pain in my quadriceps. Now, even if I rest for two weeks it still hurts when I run. Can it be some form of a light compartment syndrome? The ache is here and there along my quadriceps. I ran a marathon last week. The pain came on immediately just as I thought but it is possible to run a whole marathon. I just wonder what it can be that hurts here and there every time a put down my leg while running. I started to stretch every day now. Maybe it is something with my iliotibial band?

Staffan

Re: Quadriceps

From: Paul Shields
Category: General
Date: 10/23/98
Time: 7:26:15 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Staffan,

I am afraid I can't help you too much with the quadricep problem. I am not a doctor and you should probably have a talk with a sports familiar doctor.

Here are some pointers that may help:

- may be an overuse related injury. Stopping from running for a week or so may enable the leg to fully recover and you can then start slowly again.

- Unlikely to be a ITB related problem if you can feel it in the muscle and not at the side of the leg.

- Could be compartment related but it is in an unusual area.

- If you can localise the pain to a single 'hot' spot then it is probably a muscle tear which will need time to repair.

Sorry I can't give you any more help.

Regards

Paul

Re: Quadriceps

From: 3h30
Category: General
Date: 10/24/98
Time: 7:15:08 PM
Remote Name: 195.67.250.243

Comments

Well, it helps to stretch the quadriceps and sometimes the pain goes to the side of the hips.

Staffan


Shock absorbing shoes

From: 3h30
Category: General
Date: 10/25/98
Time: 11:10:01 PM
Remote Name: 195.67.250.243

Comments

Hi Paul, which muscles will start to hurt most when your shoes start losing their shock absorbing capability? I wonder because maybe it is the shoes that is the source to my quadriceps+hips problems!

Staffan

Re: Shock absorbing shoes

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 10/31/98
Time: 9:28:18 PM
Remote Name: 203.59.24.172

Comments

Staffan,

Yes your shoes could be a cause of the quadricep problem. Shoes normally should be changed every 600 mile /1000 km but increased injuries are often an indicator that your shoes need replacing.

Shoes can loose their shock absorbtion in the forefoot, rearfoot or more commonly all over. This reduced shock absorbtion in combination with each individuals' biomechanics can cause injury. It is hard to be general about this because each person is different. Shin splints is a common injury from reduced forefoot shock absorbtion. Knee problems are also common with reduced absorbtion. I haven't heard of quadricep pain but it may be a contributer in your case.

All the best,

Paul


Running with a cold

From: Alan Gray
Category: General
Date: 10/26/98
Time: 5:41:18 AM
Remote Name: 212.250.143.10

Comments

should you or should you not run when you have a cold. even if you feel like it people are always saying you shouldn't so please let me know

Comments

Alan,

I am not a doctor so are not qualified to provide advice. Here are some tips however.

Running with the flu can be quite dangerous. If the virus is affecting the heart muscle (which it frequently does) then sudden death can occur. You will probably have a fever and won't want to run.

If however it is a cold with no fever and minor symptoms then easy running at a slow pace may be okay.

Finally if you don't take time off and care for the cold your total layoff period might be much longer than if you just rest and recover. (It may be a symptom of overtraining).

Regards

Paul


Urgent need for information on overtraining and recovery

From: Bianca Williams, student
Category: General
Date: 10/27/98
Time: 11:40:21 AM
Remote Name: 141.132.69.191

Comments

I am currently studying Human Movement at the University of Ballarat, Australia and I am required to report on some aspect of training programs in middle distance running. I am focussing on overtraining and planning a periodised program for recovery. If you have any information at all in this area it would be greatly appreciated.

Re: Urgent need for information on overtraining and recovery

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 11/2/98
Time: 8:57:38 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.113

Comments

Bianca,

There are many symptoms of overtraining. I will indicate a few then provide you with some pointers to a few websites that amy help.

Here is a list of some more common overtraining symptoms. It is important not to take an isolated symptom but rather look for a few of then before you are sure it is overtraining:

- elevated resting pulse

- lethargy

- reduced performance

- increased susceptibility to disease

- restless sleep (insomnia)

- dull ache in your muscles

- irritability

- injury

They are just a few of the many here are some website pointers:

http://www.roble.com/marquis/coaching/wilmore1.html

http://www.halcyon.com/gasman/ovrtrng.htm

http://www.pathfinder.com/penews/drweil/19980424/story22.html

http://www.wdn.com/mirkin/fc16.html

http://www.rice.edu/~jenky/sports/overtraining.html

Hope that the above helps,

Paul


Rest Days

From: Barton Craig
Category: Coach
Date: 12/1/98
Time: 2:52:22 AM
Remote Name: 170.253.236.1

Comments

I am training for my first marathon and of course I am doing a long run and one other fairly hard day of intervals or a tempo run. Where should my rest day/days be. I have seen recommendations to rest before the long run and some after. What do you think?

Re: Rest Days

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 12/4/98
Time: 7:33:17 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.113

Comments

Barton,

Sorry about the delay in responding but I have been in the North West of Australia for a few days.

The placement of rest days is a bit of an art. I am aware of no research that looks at the the issue of resting before or after the long day, although it is a question that is commonly asked.

The best advice is to do what feels okay for you, however my view is to rest after the long day. This gives the body a full day of no activity before resuming running. That is what has worked well for me and others. The other argument goes along these lines:- some light jogging and stretching on the day after a long run helps to get blood circulating in the muscles, and this will remove toxins and promote repair.

In the end it is what works best for you. The important thing is the hard day/easy day concept.

Regards

Paul


Form Runs

From: Susan Stevenson
Category: General
Date: 12/7/98
Time: 11:57:59 PM
Remote Name: 208.255.152.241

Comments

Excellent job on the program. I have enjoyed using it very much. I have a question. My Runcoach plan has me running several form runs of up to 5 miles. What is a form run? The target heart rate zone is 80-90%. Is this for the entire run?

Re: Form Runs

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 12/8/98
Time: 9:16:09 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.113

Comments

Susan,

Thank-you for the positive comments.

Form runs are thrown into a periodized program by RunCoach to help you focus on running efficiency. You may like to look at the Training Basics guide which talks about efficiency or look at the Intervals guide which describes Form runs (http://www.sportscoach.com.au/intervals.html#strideouts)

Basically you spend some time focussing on a particular component of your form. Each run you should only concentrate on 1 or 2 things. Too many items and we don't do any well. Try focussing on these items for certain periods of the run.

- Body posture

- everything moving forward

- breathing

- leg lift

- relaxing

- etc

Each person is individual in what needs to be improved in their style. Use these runs to think about it and focus on some improvement.

Regards

Paul


Marathon...HELP!!

From: John Delaney
Category: General
Date: 12/8/98
Time: 1:22:14 AM
Remote Name: 209.86.91.253

Comments

Have been training for Dec 12 marathon, for the last 15 wks. Ran 1/2 marathon 10 days ago, and two days later got a serious sinus infection. The sickness put me in bed for 3 days, and in a non-running situation for 10 days. Now I'm 5 days from the race, and haven't put in the necessary taper miles. Can I still go on Saturday if I feel 100% later this week...or do I need to postpone it and do another marathon later? (Over the last 15 wks I have put in all the necessary training runs, i.e. 3 x 20+ milers, weekly interval training, and have averaged 45-50 miles per week)

Re: Marathon...HELP!!

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 12/9/98
Time: 5:19:08 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.113

Comments

John,

The short answer is Yes!

Even though you have missed the final week and a half of training, if you feel okay and are fully recovered from your flu then you should be able to run. In fact recent research has indicated that the final long run in preparation for a marathon should be greater than three weeks prior for best performance. So you may even do better than you think.

During the event monitor your body carefully. Start slow and maintain a comfortable pace during the event. If there are any signs of flu induced lethargy (as distinct from glycogen depletion induced lethargy) then back off.

All the best,

Paul


LONG RUN FREQUENCY

From: Barton Craig
Category: Coach
Date: 12/10/98
Time: 2:05:04 AM
Remote Name: 170.253.236.1

Comments

Paul: Thanks for your guidance on rest days. This is a great resource. Thanks for your help.

My question pertains to Long Runs. I am training for my first marathon. My long run is now up to 2.5 hours with an eye towards 4 to 5 hrs in time for Boston. So I need to increase by about .5 to 1 hr per month.

I was doing great on long runs using Jeff Galloways long slow runs. I had very little or no effect until I got to 2.5 hours. I was increasing at about 10-15 min per week for the last two months. I could easily do a long run every week.

After this weeks 2.5 hr LR I was a bit tired with heavy quads and my left arch was a little tender I took two days off and will stay around an hour for a while.

One source I saw said do the long run once every other week. Does this sound ok to you? It seems like the 2.5 hour might have been a bit of a threshold over which I stand the chance of getting more tired and or injured from the LR.

Another source said get to 3 to 4 hour LR at least once before the race and then no further. My goal is around 5 hours.

I am heavy at 210 but aerobically I can go for hours. I can bike a 5-6 hr century with no problem.

What should be my long run strategy? I was thinking 1 LR a month at 3 in Jan, 3.5 in Feb and 4 in March then taper. And keep my other medium to long days at say 1.5 to 2 hours on the other weeks that I don't do the very LR.

Does this all seem resonable to you.

Thanks again Paul.

How do we conpensate you ?

Buy stuff? From where?

Re: LONG RUN FREQUENCY

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 12/11/98
Time: 1:35:33 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.113

Comments

Craig,

Thanks for your positive comments. The website is dedicated to help purchasers of RunCoach, however I currently help anybody who asks. If the number of requests gets too large then I might change this policy!

Your long run strategy looks pretty sound. I avoid recommending once per week long runs and usually go for the once every 2 weeks with a build of no greater than 10%. (This is the default RunCoach view). Going for the long run once every 3 or 4 weeks is also fine as long as you keep the mileage up in the other weeks.

Jeff Galloway's approach of a a slow build to an overdistance run where speed is of lessor importance is great for first time marathoners and others who don't train regularly. Normally I will push for long runs around 20 miles (or greater) which are a little faster than Galloway's to better simulate event conditions.

Recent research has also shown that your last long run should be at least 3-4 weeks before the marathon for optimum performance. Don't do your final long run in the previous two weeks before the event.

Finally aeobic endurance conditioning is muscle specific. You obviously have the capacity to train your running muscles for LSD but you will need to do some running to get this conditioning.

Regards

Paul

Re: LONG RUN FREQUENCY

From: Barton Craig
Category: General
Date: 12/12/98
Time: 3:45:01 AM
Remote Name: 170.253.236.1

Comments

Paul: Thanks again for your help. I appreciate it. I will buy the PC Coach just to get on your list.

I didn't realize that aerobic endurance was muscle specific. When I think about it though it makes perfect sense, of course it is.

I just assumed from my biking days that I could go forever running like I could biking.

My muscles need to get used to the pounding. I guess that was one reason I biked in the first place. As I remember biking was also muscle specific and was actually harder on my knees than running. (Seated hill climbing and power intervals etc.)

Thanks again

Bart


Return from Stress Fracture

From: vorro@pilot.msu.edu
Category: General
Date: 12/12/98
Time: 11:41:15 PM
Remote Name: 207.75.187.198

Comments

I would like to hear from folks with experience on getting young runners back on the track running after early bilateral tibia stress fractures. My 18 yr. old son has been diagnosed (MRI, etc.) with early stage bilateral tibia stress fractures. Although actual fractures did not occur, he had significant pain, and MRI showed edema in the medullary cavities and significant inflamation of the bone shafts. He was fitted with the correct orthotics and finished his senior year of cross country and has not been running since late October. His doctor told him not to run for 8 weeks, but he does general exercise 5xweek and uses a stairmaster each time for his cardio-vascular fitness. His goal is to run 1:57-1:58 in the 800 (he ran 2:05 last year) this coming spring track season. What is the best way for him to begin running again? What kind of transition should he make to begin running training again? I'd appreciate thoughts concerning progression, distances, times, etc. Thank you very much. Joseph Vorro - please reply via e-mail vorro@pilot.msu.edu

Re: Return from Stress Fracture

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 12/14/98
Time: 8:06:40 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.113

Comments

Joseph,

Stress fractures can be frustrating injuries becasuse they take so much time to heel. I am not a doctor so can't be specific in my help but here are some tips.

It is best during this period that you maintain your son's fitness by doing some cross training activities. These can include swimming, pool running, weightwork and cycling or rowing if it doesn't cause pain. In general if there is no pain then you can continue. RICE and anti imflammatories can also help with immediate pain treatment. Normal time spent off is about 6-8 weeks.

There are a number of types of stress fractures that need extra treatment because they develop delayed union or nonunion. (Prevalent in the femur). In these cases you should try and identify the cause (most often overtraining, but could also be running surface related) and eliminate it. One way is to try a few activities, and running surfaces, and see which causes pain. Then stop it!

Here are some internet sites that may also help:

http://www.medmedia.com/oa4/78.htm

http://espn.sportszone.com/editors/health/stressfracture.html

http://uplink.syr.edu/running/chargers/therapy/chapt29.htm

Regards

Paul

PS

If you get any replies by email please post them here as it may help others with similiar problems.


Quadriceps - fix

From: 3h30
Category: General
Date: 12/16/98
Time: 5:43:40 PM
Remote Name: 195.67.84.179

Comments

Well, I went to a naprapat and she told me my hamstrings are short. This will then tilt my pelvis. This in turn will harm my rectus femoris (one of the four quadriceps muscles). So the cure is to stretch the hamstrings. Due to all this I have been a bit lazy lately, so Im not sure at all if I will get around in Stockholm at 3h30. Anyway I will try.

Re: Quadriceps

From: Paul Shields
Category: General
Date: 12/17/98
Time: 8:28:38 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.113

Comments

Staffan,

It is good to see that you have fixed the quadriceps problem.

A more common issue is muscle strength imbalance. Where this is the case, strengthening the opposing muscle group can fix these problems.

Good luck on the 3h30 and remember not to build your training too quickly to make up for lost time.

All the best,

Paul


Pain

From: Gareth
Category: General
Date: 12/19/98
Time: 8:35:38 AM
Remote Name: 195.99.63.169

Comments

I am a 16 year old runner from England. I compete in lots of local races, both road and cross country varying in length from about 5 miles to 10. I train quite herd - I usually run just over 4 miles a day, taking one rest day a week. I also go to the gym and do weights/treadmill training. Recently, I got a pain in what feels like the joint of where the top of the leg meets the hip, and it won't go away (it hurts whenever I put a lot of wieght on it, i.e. whilst running on that leg). I have tried resting it for 2 days, and it did get a bit better, but it's still there. I don't want to do any permanent damage, but I don't want to be out of action for too long (important races coming up).

Any advice appreciated,

Gareth

Re: Pain

From: Paul Shields
Category: General
Date: 12/21/98
Time: 8:56:48 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.113

Comments

Gareth,

I am not a doctor and would recommend that you get some advice from one, however I can give you some general tips.

You should not run if there is pain. Please take a long term view of injuries and consider resting long enough that the damage has healed. This can be extremely difficult when important events are nearby but it will keep you running longer.

There could be several reasons for the pain. A couple I might mention are ligaments or tendons. Both of these require some time to heal. Stair climbing and cycling can often be the cause of tendon soreness near the knee.

Here are some sites that may help you to diagnose it better:

http://www.mayohealth.org/mayo/9312/htm/kneepain.htm

http://www.teleport.com/~drrick/articles/art19.html

http://www.sleeptight.com/EncyMaster/O/Osgood-Schlatter_disease.html

http://www.drugbase.co.za/data/med_info/knee.htm

Hope that the above helps and that you get over it quickly.

Regards

Paul


Weight loss - muscle development

From: Sue Elliott
Category: General
Date: 12/22/98
Time: 10:46:30 AM
Remote Name: 203.20.86.39

Comments

For years I have been trying to lose weight although i'm fit I have a problem keeping the weight off. Recently my health store introduced me to a new product produced in New Zealand. I gave it a go and within a week had lost 1.5 kilos. The product simply works by feeding your muscle groups and this allows your body to regain shape and burn off that nasty fat. If you would like info on this product pls email at bands@hlos.com.au Sue.

Re: Weight loss - muscle developement - rubbish

From: Paul Shields
Category: General
Date: 12/22/98
Time: 1:15:16 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.113

Comments

Sue,

Normally I would delete blatant advertising from this message board but I will leave your message there as an example to others.

There are no quick fixes to the weight loss/muscle gain issue that do not have side effects. If you elect not to tamper with the biochemistry in your body then exersize will produce muscle development and eating less calories than you use will decrease weight.

This message is particularly silly because it shows both a lack of understanding of the effects of this substance and also a completely unhealthy (dangerous and unlikely) weight reduction effect. It cannot do as implied - only 'feeding your muscle groups' and so, if it works, then it must simply be an appetite suppressant. If so then these can be potentially very harmful. Another option is that it is some form of drug and so may have more deleterious effects. The most likely option is that it has no effect whatsoever.

If anybody should choose to try this then do so at your own risk. I am aware that these quick fix weight loss solutions are a multi million dollar industry and many people are gullible enough to believe the claims.

Exersize and watching your diet are still the best long term solutions to weight loss and muscle strength improvement.

Regards

Re: Weight loss - muscle developement - rubbish

From: Barton Craig
Category: Admin
Date: 12/22/98
Time: 10:36:49 PM
Remote Name: 170.253.236.1

Comments

Paul:

Thanks for telling it like it is!!

Keep up the good work.

Bart


short to long distance, how?

From: ema dearsley
Category: General
Date: 12/25/98
Time: 5:54:39 AM
Remote Name: 205.188.192.157

Comments

Im 17 and an 800m runner, a year and a half ago I was ranked 7th nationally at this event and am regually competing at county level but above anything else I want to be a triathlete. I already do around 11 hours swimming a week and cycle when I can, so this isn't the problem. The problem is that I need to convert my self from a middle distance track runner to a 10km road runner. I realise that I won't beable to do this overnight but I would like advice on how I can do it as quickly as possible but avoiding injury. The past year I havn't competed as well as I went through a growth period but now I want to try again and really concentrate on running as this is my weakest bit in triathlons. I have spoken to my coach in running but it is hard as im expected to do the track season so if there is any advice you could give me on how I could start working towards long distance road running it would be of great help thanks Ema

Re: short to long distance, how?

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 12/28/98
Time: 11:47:09 AM
Remote Name: 203.59.24.172

Comments

Ema,

Converting from a short distance runner to a runner who targets longer distances is much easier than going the other way. It is possible to 'train' fast twitch muscle fibres to act like to more efficient slow twitch variety.

As you are focussing on the triathlon you should also remember that you need to train each sport individually. There is some crossover but specificity is the key. Using the hard/easy rule with three sports can be tricky, your legs being the one to watch after several 'hard' days alternating cycling and running.

With running there are a couple of simple rules that will help you with the conversion to longer distances. The first is to increase both your total weekly miles and your long run distance by no more than 10% per week. When you are keen to improve often we increase too quickly. Try and stick to the 10% rule.

The next simple rule is to create a training plan around the long run. You will be doing some faster running for your track event and so you need to shift the emphasis to the longer distances. You should run these relatively slowly and as you start doing this you will probably notice a decrease in your 800m performance. Don't worry about this as it should be more than compensated by an improvement in longer distance performance.

If you just do the above two things then it will be a good start. You should also try to fit in some AT (threshold) runs and some dual sport days where you get used to the transitions.

There is much more but hopefully the above will give you some initial pointers.

Regards

Paul


Muscle Bulk

From: Billy Shnilly
Category: General
Date: 12/25/98
Time: 4:27:23 PM
Remote Name: 203.17.224.248

Comments

Hi, I'm a 19 yr old Rugby Union player. I've been doing weights for about five years now, but I'm starting to look into creatine, chromium, L-Cartinine for improvements. I have weighed 90kg for about two years but I want to weigh at about 105kg. Will these supplements help me gain weight - but in muscle mass rather than fat. Also, will L-Cartinine help me lose excess fat???

Thanks for your help.

shnilly@yahoo.com

Re: Muscle Bulk

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 12/28/98
Time: 1:05:41 PM
Remote Name: 203.59.24.172

Comments

Billy,

I am not an expert on supplements and normally avoid recommending them. Building muscle bulk can be a disadvantage in running but normally to do this you would use low repetition weight training.

Here are some pointers to some websites that may help you:

Creatine Monohydrate

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/sthur6.htm

http://www.raysahelian.com/creatine.html

Chromium Picolinate

http://www.mayohealth.org/mayo/askdiet/htm/new/qd961005.htm

http://www.mediconsult.com/general/drugs/automation/202614.html

L-Cartinine

http://www.t-rexpromo.com/entrenet/entrenetcalif.htm

Although the L-Cartinine reference is not much help.

The supplement that seems to have the best clinical results is the creatine however there are some ambiguous results and side effects.

Be very careful with any supplements.

Regards

Paul


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