Page Loading... please wait!


This message not going away?
Ensure Javascript is on and click the box
Nov 24, 2017 - 10:28 PM  
RunCoach  
 
            
HomeTopicsForumsSearchDownloads

1998 Forum Archive - Training C

RunCoach Forums 1998 Archive - Training C

Body Mass Index

From: Peter Clark
Category: Coach
Date: 7/6/98
Time: 10:46:49 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Paul,

Your program is just getting better & better!

Would you please explain "Body Mass Index"

Thanks

Peter

Re: Body Mass Index

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 7/6/98
Time: 10:50:11 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Peter,

Thanks for the positive comments about RunCoach. I certainly have seen some increased popularity lately.

Body Mass Index

The BMI is one of the standard correct weight for height measures. It takes a person's weight in kilograms and divides it by their height in meters squared. The higher the figure the more overweight you are.

Recently in the US a group of experts under auspices of the NIH defined overweight and obese using the BMI. A BMI of 25 or over would be overweight, whilst over 30 would be obese. By this standard some 55% of Americans are overweight (cf 40% of Australians) .

Like any of these types of measures it is only an indication and other issues such as body type and shape have a bearing as well.

Regards

Paul


Karnonen Heart Rate Reserve

From: Peter Clark
Category: Coach
Date: 7/6/98
Time: 10:54:29 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Paul,

Another new concept that appeared in the latest beta was "Karnonen Heart Rate Reserve". Could you help out with this one as well.

Thanks

Peter

Re: Karvonen Heart Rate Reserve

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 7/6/98
Time: 11:04:29 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Peter,

Karvonen Heart Rate Reserve

This the most common method for determining a heart rate training zone. It determines the actual range of bpm (beats per minute) that can change when a person goes from resting to training at maximum capacity. This is the difference between the maximum pulse and a person's resting pulse. For example with a maximum pulse of 180bpm and a resting pulse of 60bpm, the heart rate reserve is 120bpm.

To calculate a training zone you first calculate a percentage of the heart rate reserve then add the resting pulse to it to get the actual pulse.

This has been determined to be a more accurate guide to actual effort than simply taking a straight percentage of the maximum.

You may also like to look at these discussion database articles

http://www.sportscoach.com.au/runcoachdiscus/_disc1/0000000e.htm

http://www.sportscoach.com.au/runcoachdiscus/_disc1/0000002d.htm

All the best,

Paul


Effects of Age and Weight

From: Michael Conley
Category: Coach
Date: 7/13/98
Time: 12:25:29 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Greetings Paul,

I'm preparing for a marathon. I have a 2h59m PB, but that was back in 1983. I'm about 10 kg heavier now (68.5 then, 80 kg now) Weights coming down as I train. The training plan still says I can train to run a 2:59 as my current abilty. I'm trying to see if I can pull it off but I'm not sure I can.

I ran a marathon 2 years ago in 3m26s but it was in 0 degree C and rain. (Pretty bad conditions). Question is, Should the prediction take into acount age slowdown and weight?

Thanks,

Michael

Re: Effects of Age and Weight

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 7/13/98
Time: 12:28:30 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Michael,

With the training plan that RunCoach provides the main thing is keeping to the distances and interval times that the program suggests. If you can comfortably keep to the plan then in most cases it doesn't matter what your age is or how much you weigh. The fact that you can do the intervals required and can achieve the long runs means that you should achieve your target.

Setting the target is a different matter. Both age and weight have an effect on your current ability. The DOS version of RunCoach took into account of the age of the user when generating a current ability but I have taken that out of the Windows version. I intend to upgrade the performance prediction system again and better account for age and weight. Until then here are some rules of thumb.

Weight

Weight has a direct relationship to performance. The first issue is finding out your ideal weight for running. This will vary for the distance you are training for and cannot be too light or too heavy. There are several rules of thumb but the best system is to let your body find it's optimum. As a loose guide a BMI between 20 and 22 would be ideal for a champion level runner. Once this has been determined then any extra pounds over this will directly affect your performance. The relationship is one to one. A 5% increase in weight will result in a 5% decrease in performance, all other things being equal (particularly training).

Age

Age also affects performance. Amongst sedentary people VO2max drops off by about 0.9% per year after age 25. For regular trainers/runners your VO2max can remain virtually the same in your twenties and thirties. It will then start a decline slightly less than for the untrained. If you are over 25 then you might like to factor in a performance decline since you had your PB. I have spoken about this factor in another post ( http://www.sportscoach.com.au/runcoachdiscus/_disc1/00000097.htm

Hope the above helps,

Paul


What to eat before a race?

From: Steve Portokalis
Category: Coach
Date: 7/19/98
Time: 12:20:37 PM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Hi Paul,

What do you recommend eating before a 5k race (6 hours before)? More protein, more carbohydrates? How about a steak?

Regards

Steve

Re: What to eat before a race?

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 7/19/98
Time: 12:32:06 PM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Steve,

There is much discussion amongst scientists/coaches about pre-race diets. I will give you some general guidelines and hope they will help. Then main consideration for the shorter races is that you don't want any gastro-intestinal upsets during the race. For longer races you also need to ensure that your glycogen stores are topped up. As you asked about a shorter race I will focus on the stomach related upsets.

The first thing is that any food which is still being digested has the potential to cause some problems. This means that you should try and avoid eating anything up to two hours before the race. Some runners have slight intolerances to various foods (most commonly lactose (milk)) so look out for that. You can eat something 5-6 hours before a race. For longer races there is some debate about the consumption of fatty foods to increase fatty acid concentration and thereby spare glycogen but for shorter races you should avoid protein and fats. Easily digestible food like simple carbohydrates (bread, cereals, sugars, honey) is the best option. These foods will be out of the stomach by race time and should cause no problems.

Given the above, each person is different, and you should experiment during training to find out which foods affects you least.

Hope the above helps,

Paul


Dead Legs

From: Jason Peterman
Category: Coach
Date: 7/19/98
Time: 12:22:39 PM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Paul,

I have had problems with my legs feeling dead now for about 2 years. I have gone to doctors and they could tell me nothing. I have also taken time off. Nothing I have tried is working. My coach has no idea either. This has constantly been affecting my performance and this is my senior year of high school and I would like it to be my best. I would really appreciate it if you could help me.

Jason

Re: Dead Legs

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 7/19/98
Time: 12:35:05 PM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Jason,

I am not a doctor so cannot give you a medical diagnosis but these few pointers may help.

First of all you should rule out iron deficiency. Because of the length of time of the symptoms it is unlikely to be iron problems but get your ferritin levels checked. Have a read of the discussion database article on this (http://www.sportscoach.com.au/runcoachdiscus/_disc1/00000033.htm)

The next issue, which is also probably not the case, is overtraining. You should ensure over the season that you get adequate rest in your training program. Make sure you alternate hard/easy days and hard/easy weeks and have a gradual increase in intensity and distance.

Diet may also play a factor. Make sure you are getting a balanced diet which has a high proportion of carbohydrates. For vitamins, minerals and enzymes, fresh fruit and vegetables are also recommended. A vitamin supplement may also be useful if you feel you are deficient.

Are you still growing? If you are experiencing an increase in bone and muscle mass then this can cause pain/ dead feelings in some cases. If this is the case then you can't do much just take it easy until you reach your final height.

Finally there are a variety af illnesses that may affect your energy production systems, both the oxygen transport and the energy conversion. One of these is Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). You should really make sure that your doctor checks for these exotic type conditions. As a longshot you may have something akin to "Restless Legs Syndrome". Your symptoms are not the same as for this but there may be some similar response. Have a look at this URL for more information http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/somno/

The above is probably not much help as you probably have checked them all.

Let us know how it turns out

Regards

Paul


Sciatica

From: Peter Clark
Category: Coach
Date: 7/19/98
Time: 12:24:51 PM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Paul,

I have developed a pain which runs down my entire left leg and have been to a chiropractor who indicated that this was sciatica and proceed to adjust my pelvis. This cleared up th problem until after I ran 36K one day & then did a hilly 12k run the next day. Since then I've been back to the chiropractor three times with little improvement and have basically not run for four days. He now says that the sciatic nerve can be affected by a muscle surrounding it and is working on massaging this muscle and having me do some stretching. Do you have any information on treating this type of problem in runners and suggestions as to what I can do to maintain fitmess while this problem gets cleared up.

Thanks

Peter Clark

Re: Sciatica

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 7/19/98
Time: 12:37:18 PM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Peter,

Sciatica can be so frustrating. You should make sure that you identify the cause of the problem and eliminate it as sciatica pain can hang around for years if you ignore it. I will give you a few tips but it would also be useful to see a sports oriented doctor as they will have some good advice

As you probably know sciatica is caused by irritation of the sciatic nerve at the base of the spine. This is most commonly caused by a squashed or displaced disc. Overtime, if you eliminate the cause, the offending portion of the disc should shrivel up releasing the pressure. The first thing is that RICE won't help too much but anti-inflammatories will (asprin, isobrufen etc).

With runners several things can be the cause. Firstly leg length discrepancy could be the problem and if so then orthotics can alleviate it. Another cause is running on banked surfaces (eg the camber at the edge of a road). Try and vary the the banking to each side in these cases. The running surface can also be a problem. Harder surfaces (eg cement) can cause more jarring of the spine. In these cases changing shoes, to ones with more shock protection, can often help. Finally changing you running posture (eg when running hills) can cause pressure to be exerted on different parts of the back. In these instances try and run more upright when hill running.

When trying to get over it avoiding running may be the best course of action!! I know this is difficult to do when you are training for an event. As a half measure I have found that running but only in places and on surfaces where you don't get any pain may work as well. If you get any pain, tingling etc then it is best to slow down or stop. Alternatives like cycling, walking, and running in a vest in the water will help to keep your cardiovascular system in tune. Also treadmill running may cause less shock to your system so try it and see. The minimum needed to maintain your current level of fitness is two intense sessions per week. Also strengthenig opposing upper leg/lower back muscle groups can also help and of course stretching.

Hope the above helps a bit. I know it can be difficult with sciatica.

Regards

Paul


Pool Running, How to run when you can't

From: Peter Clark
Category: Coach
Date: 7/27/98
Time: 2:03:03 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Paul,

I suffered a injury that has turned out (apparently) to be a muscle in my butt that is contracting around a branch/root of the sciatic nerve.

It was starting to feel better through rest and stretching and after a week off I tried to run but pain started right away and I packed it in after 5 minutes. So I've started to do some pool running and biking to keep up my fitness level. Any tips on how long/intensity for pool running and a general program I could follow for the next three to four weeks (it could be that long I think).

I still want to run a marathon in October if possible. An alternative if you think this is not feasible is a marathon in November.

Thanks for your help.

Peter

Re: Pool Running, How to run when you can't

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 7/27/98
Time: 2:10:01 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Peter,

Layoffs are always difficult. Lets see what we can do to keep you fit.

Pool Running

Research has shown that running in the pool trying to mimic similiar actions to the land provides a good deal of crossover to land running. In terms of keeping fit for running it is a better exersize than any other form of cross training. When pool running, follow your usual training schedule in terms of frequency, intensity, and speed. Be sure to stretch your hamstrings afterwards because you use a shortened stride length.

Biking

Cycling is a common activity for people who are injured at running. Although it keeps you cardiovascular system in shape there is little crossover in terms of muscle groups and actions with running. The only area where there seems to be some help is in hill climbing. If you ride hills on the bike then there is some evidence that it helps with your hill running. Add some cycling to your program.

Walking

Often when we can't run we may be able to walk. If you can walk without injury then adding some brisk walking to your shedule can provide some real benefit. Some people recommend over exagerating your upper body hand actions.

Strengthening and Stretching

You should also try and identify the opposing muscle groups the the muscle that is irritating your sciatic nerve. Strengthening these may also help. Gentle stretching to ensure a good range of motion is also important.

Your main focus should be the pool running with some added biking and walking if possible. The pool can get boring but try, if possible, to stick with the Runcoach suggested workouts. You may however need to cut them shorter. Instead of distance go with time for the intervals. If you can walk then use this for the long distance workouts.

Hope the above helps

Paul


Marathon Training

From: Staffan Malmberg
Category: Coach
Date: 7/30/98
Time: 12:05:32 AM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Paul

My question this time is why you donīt put in any interval or tempo run when I wanīt e.g to run in 3:30 next year. The coach always proposes 5 days easy running. How can that be? I mean reading Runners World and so on they say that interval training (power interval) is the BEST thing you can do to enhance your running. Analysing your method I can see that there is a slow gradual increase of pace in those easy runs. Thats all!

By the way, I ran 18,3 km in 1h26min (controlled not exhausted tempo) which gives 4,44 min/km. I put in that in PB and then coach said my ability (green color) was now 3h34m. Still coach says its hopeless for me to run in 3h30m NEXT year with 1 speed and 1 long run per week!!!

I read a book called Training, lactate, pulse rate. The deflection speed can be roughly estimated as the pace you can do for one hour. So now I estimate my deflection speed to 4,38 min/km. If you divide this by 0,943 you get the possible speed to run a marathon, i.e 4,55 min/km which is about 3:27. How do you reach your figure 3:34?

Best regards

Staffan

Re: Marathon Training

From: Paul Shields
Category: General
Date: 7/30/98
Time: 12:18:08 AM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Staffan,

RunCoach is excellent at producing intervals and threshold(tempo) runs.

RunCoach classifies runners into several categories and depending on the category will program speedwork into your training program. You can override RunCoach's selections when you 'Design a Program' by increasing the speedwork setiing to 1 or 2 (or even 3). If you are only getting easy and long runs then you must be designing programs with speedwork set on 0. For long training programs, Runcoach will switch from a complex training regime to a periodized one with varying macrocycles. The first macrocycle is a base period and will mainly focus on the long run with few speed sessions.

Runners World are correct intervals are an excellent method of increasing speed and RunCoach is great at generating interval sessions.

With your controlled tempo run as a baseline RunCoach is better able to predict your current ability. The 3h34m is in fact extremely close to that predicted by the deflection speed method so both methods are probably reasonable. RunCoach bases it's prediction on a complicated 3 model interlocked system based on statistical analysis of many runners performances. If you click on the 'Suggest a Goal' button you should find that RunCoach will provide a target better than the 3h30m you are aiming for.

By the way the 'Training Lactate' book is quite good. It is one of the books I keep in my library.

Regards

Paul

Re: Marathon Training

From: Staffan Malmberg
Category: Coach
Date: 7/30/98
Time: 10:30:21 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Paul,

Well, what I meant was that always when I push the button suggest a goal coach selects 5 easy days of running and no speed. Iīm aware that I can force the program to do my kind of training.

But looking at the print there is something wrong with the weekly distance. E.g if I run 42k is one week it should write 42k not 84000.

I have a bit pain in my shin splints which I have never had before!. This must be due to my speedwork. Hmmm... Perhaps I should listen to the coach anyhow and turn to 5 easy days instead?

Well, what do you think, Iīm running a marathon in August 8th. Should I rest until then? My last training was the controlled (not exhausted) tempo run over 18,3 km (July 26).

Best regards

Staffan

Re: Marathon Training

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 7/30/98
Time: 10:32:14 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Staffan,

Sorry about the misunderstanding. RunCoach classifies runners into 4 types. This is primarily to determine how much speed work it thinks you are capable of handling. This is, of course, only an average assesment and will be wrong for many people but hopefully it is right for most. Based on an injury reduction strategy RunCoach felt that speedwork may not be appropriate for you right now. You can always override this, and in practice I often do.

You are right about the weekly distance issue. I changed the way it calculates weekly ditance and forgot to alter the report printing module. I have fixed it and will get a quick bug release by the end of the week.

Shin Splints can be a problem. I have already answered someone on this in the database. The answer is here with some pointers http://www.sportscoach.com.au/runcoachdiscus/_disc1/00000078.htm

For most people having a taper for two weeks before a marathon would not be a problem however you have a particularly light workload. I would suggest using RICE on the shin splints and doing only easy runs leading up to the August 8th Marathon. If you get any pain then back off.

Regards

Paul


Stress Fracture in Thigh, Hamstring strain

From: terry gavin
Category: General
Date: 8/2/98
Time: 11:37:01 AM
Remote Name: 152.163.201.193

Comments

i've suffered with stress fracture for 9 mths - took 3mths off running - xray showed no new growth. what will speed this recovery? Hamstring pull/strain is killing me - it's not sciatica - what's best treatment.

Re: Stress Fracture in Thigh, Hamstring strain

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 8/3/98
Time: 4:25:38 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Terry,

Stress fractures can be frustrating injuries becasuse they take so much time to heel. I am not a doctor so can't be specific in my help but here are some tips.

It is best during this period that you maintain your fitness by doing some cross training activities. These can include swimming, pool running, weightwork and cycling or rowing if it doesn't cause thigh pain. In general if there is no pain then you can continue. RICE and anti imflammatories can also help with immediate pain treatment. Normal time spent off is about 6-8 weeks.

There are a number of types of stress fractures that need extra treatment because they develop delayed union or nonunion. (Prevalent in the femur) This sounds like your situation. In these cases you should try and identify the cause (most often overtraining, but could also be running surface related) and eliminate it. One way is to try a few activities, and running surfaces, and see which causes pain. Then stop it!

Hamstring strains are fairly common and there are many sources of information. Here are a couple that may help:

http://espn.sportszone.com/editors/health/hamstringtips.html

http://www.wdn.com/mirkin/q18.html

http://www.runnersworld.com/injuries/hmstrng.html

Basically you should aplly RICE immediately after the injury. Do alternate exersizes for at least 48 hours afterwood or the pain stops. Also anti-imflammatories can help.

Regards

Paul


Help, Shin splints!!!!!!

From: Liza Eisenhart
Category: General
Date: 8/8/98
Time: 10:33:26 AM
Remote Name: 209.166.151.108

Comments

I am a junior in high school and run on the cross-country team. Last season I got shin-splints about midway through. I suffered through the season and then stopped running immediately after. Now I've been doing my summer running for this season and I have shin splints again. I do run on pavement, and I know that could be part of the problem. I have arch support insoles, and I haven't really noticed a difference. I'm doing the training reccommended by my coach, so I don't think I'm overtraining. When I walk my toes point inward, could this be part of the problem? Do you have any suggestions on how to get rid of this awful pest for good so my cross-country season insn't ruined again? I would really appreciate it.

Thanks,

Liza Eisenhart

Re: Help, Shin splints!!!!!!

From: Mike Conley
Category: General
Date: 8/8/98
Time: 12:23:48 PM
Remote Name: 206.29.116.234

Comments

I sent this earlier to another runner having shin splint problems. If I don't do this exercise, I have the problem too.

The late Dr. Sheehan conceived of the "magic six" exercises to prevent runner's related injuries. Check out http://www.clark.net/pub/pribut/stayout.html. There is a discription of each of the exercises The "Shin Splinter" is a good exercise and has done me world's of good. Hanging weights over my toes didn't work well for me, so here what I do.

1. Lay face down in your bed with your feet just over the edge. 2. Pull your toes "up" into the mattress (the mattress provides the resistance) and hold for about 10 second. 3. repeat about 10 times.

While you are holding, you should feel alittle "burning" (not painful) sensation. I do the exercise right before I go to sleep.

I hope this helps. Good luck in Cross Country!!

Good Luck!!!

Mike

Re: Help, Shin splints!!!!!!

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 8/10/98
Time: 11:39:41 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Lisa,

Mike, as usual, has given some good advice. I will try and help a little more. I am not a doctor but can give you some pointers.

Firstly you should read other posts I have made on this common problem. An example is http://www.sportscoach.com.au/runcoachdiscus/_disc1/00000078.htm A way to find other information in this database is to use the 'Search' function. Just click search then type 'shin splints' and press return.

Chronic shin splints can be caused from a variety of factors. If after reading the above posts and you still can't get help then seeking medical advice may be the only way. Although you are probably not in this category, some people have operations which can relieve pressure in the compartments in the front of their shins.

Hope the above helps,

Paul


Heart Rate and Deflection Pulse

From: Staffan Malmberg
Category: Coach
Date: 8/10/98
Time: 11:51:04 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Hi,

I just bought a Polar HRM. Iīm going to do a Conconi test today and my question is: When I have the deflection pace and the pulse rate belonging to this pace how do I run in the later part of a marathon when my heart beat is about 10 beats higher at the same speed due to dehydration? Do I adjust my speed so that the heart rate is the same throughout the run or do I continue at my initial speed? Maybe the latter choice brings me over the anaerobic threshold?  

I see everywhere about pulse training that the advices are always expressed as a % of your maximum pulse. Shouldnīt it be expressed as a percentage of your deflection pulse instead? The gap between deflection pulse and MHR is not constant!  

Staffan Malmberg

Re: Heart Rate and Deflection Pulse

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 8/10/98
Time: 11:56:18 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Staffan,

Pulse monitors are great tools, and can help you alot in your training.

There is much debate about the meaning of the deflection pulse. Most people call it the anaeobic threshold or turning point and signifies a rapid increase in blood lactate levels.

Running at above these levels can cause an increase in blood lactate and unless you have a high ability to buffer it then you will eventually slow down.

Research has shown that running even splits is the fastest way to race. This means that your heart rate will gradually rise in a perfectly run race. It will be somewhat lower than you would like at the beginning and somewhat higher at the end. Training and hydration will tend to decrease this range. For well trained and hydrated people it can be nearly constant on a flat course.

Deflection pulse will vary with training. In untrained people it can be as low as 50% of maximum whilst in trained people it can be as high as 95% of maximum. Most pace recommendations will offer a suggestion that is a fixed percentage of a known pace eg marathon pace is 85% of 3k pace. If pulse based recommendations are needed then you will need to get a readout of the AT pulse rate. Then yes, a fixed percentage of this can be used.

You are right, with training, the gap between the deflection pulse and the maximum will decrease.

Regards

Paul


Pulse Zone Advice

From: Staffan Malmberg
Category: Coach
Date: 8/14/98
Time: 6:31:47 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Paul

Following is a table of different advices for training with a pulse monitor. My deflection pulse is 174.   Advice from                        Long distance         Threshold/Tempo           Interval

Training, lactate...                 146-157                      164-174                        177-187

RunCoach HR                      157-170                      170-184                        184-198

RunCoach Pmax                  149-168                     168-188                        188-198

Karvonen                               143-164                      177-184                        184-198

Pmax                                          <149                        158-178                        178-198     So, which one should I choose? RunCoach HR has a high pulse for long distance, so no wonder you write "Donīt run too hard". Also for Tempo your HR interval of 170-184 is high. Most of the time itīs over deflection pulse.

I saw a note from runners World that tempo should be run at 168-178.

What do you say about all this?   Regards

Staffan

Re: Pulse Zone Advice

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 8/14/98
Time: 6:35:13 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Hi Staffan,

Training pulse rates are difficult to determine without good information. There are three critical measurements to help determine ranges. Your maximum pulse, your resting pulse, and your lactate threshold or deflection pulse. Once you have these you can be more accurate in determining a range.

From the sources you have, the threshold/tempo and interval runs are quite similiar. RunCoach prefers to be on or slightly above the deflection pulse whilst others prefer to be slightly below. My reasoning is that you need to increase it so you should stress your body at slightly higher than it currently is.

Interval pulses will vary depending on the type of interval. For shorter harder ones it will be near the maximum of the range whilst for longer rythm intervals it will be near the lower end.

Long runs cause some controversy. RunCoach trys to get runners to more closely mimic race pace. If you always run slowly then you will do so in a race. So RunCoach's 'easy' days are the easy runs whilst the long runs are slightly harder. Others have both there easy pace and long run pace (or heart rate) about the same. I don't believe this gives enough race simulation.

Hope that helps

Paul


Pulse changes during the day

From: Staffan Malmberg
Category: Coach
Date: 8/14/98
Time: 6:38:05 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Hi again,

I read somewhere that the resting pulse goes up about 10 beats in the evening compared to morning. Does this also go for deflection pulse and maximum pulse?

I always do intervals in the evening so maybe I have to adjust my Polar watch with 10 beats to get the right pace for intervals?

Staffan

Re: Pulse changes during the day

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 8/14/98
Time: 6:40:01 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Staffan,

Your resting heart rate will vary depending on the level of metabolic activity that is going on in your body. When people say resting heart rate they mean 'basal' heart rate. This is the heart rate where minimum metabolic activity is occurring. It is the blood (and energy) flow required to keep the body and brain going without any other muscular activity.

In the evenings your general metablic activity, including body temperature, can be higher so your pulse is higher. It will also vary due to ambient temperature, stress levels, activity, hydration etc. This is why it is best to measure it at the same time every day. I recommend when you wake up.

Deflection pulse will also vary depending on stress, temperature and hydration. The pulse measurement is only a guide to the lactate build up in your system. This is why you should take a range rather than an exact pulse. Newer polar monitors have a system for detecting pulse changes around the deflection point and so adjust for this on the run.

All the best,

Paul


Why pulse and pace varies from day to day

From: Staffan Malmberg
Category: Coach
Date: 8/17/98
Time: 8:02:10 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Hi,

Today I was out on a 32km race. I looked on my Conconi curve and saw that 5:20 min/km would give a pulse of 159, well below my deflection point of 174.

After 12 km I was heavy in my upper legs so it wasnīt my day today. After coming home I saw that my average pace was bad, 5:48 min/km at average beat of 166. This is 16 beats above the curve!

I know that dehydration increases my beat by about 10. During this race I drank 7 bottles of 1,5 dl each (honey water). So about 1 liter. I was very thirsty when I came home. So I think that both the hilliness of the route (not an oval track exactly) and the dehydration made my point on the pulse rate vs pace curve deviate so much.

When doing 5*1km intervals the other day my point was only 3 beats from the Conconi curve. That deviation I think is to 100% due to hilliness.

My question today is:

Is the amount of work done by the body greater with a pulse rate of say 170 than with a pulse rate of 160 if I in the former case is slightly dehydrated and have a lower pace in comparison to a fresh start with the pulse 160?   Regards

Staffan

PS. My max pulse during the run today was 187, so its pretty hard now and then during the race.

Re: Why pulse and pace varies from day to day

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 8/17/98
Time: 8:04:58 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Staffan,

It doesn't sound like a very good day at all. Don't be too discouraged we all have days like this. I am sure things will get better.

There are several possible reasons for the poor performance.

The first possibility is over training! Training, and especially hard training, actually breaks down the body. This is fine if you make sure that you rest. During your rest days and weeks your body rebuilds the damaged muscles and other systems. This is why rest is just as important as hard training. If you have been training hard with no rest or didn't taper before the race then it could be over training.

The next is the hills. If your course was hilly then you should not be running at the same pace all of the race. If your speed is 5m20s on the flat then it should be slower on the hills and slightly faster on the downhills. This is where your pulse monitor is very useful. Use it to set your pace. Try and keep the pulse in a range and slow down or speed up to keep it in the zone. This will automatically slow you down up hills. You don't gain as much going downhill as you loose going uphill so your overall pace will be slower with hills.

Finally it could be hydration. If you are not getting enough water, and 1 litre, for a 32km race seems lowish depending on the heat. If you feel thirsty then you are already slightly dehydrated so start drinking early and drink constantly.

It could also be other factors such as diet (low glycogen) or no specific hill training.

There is approximately a direct relationship between pulse changes and effort. When your pulse rate goes up by a set ammount the effort will increase accordingly. You need to adjust for your resting pulse but with a 10% increase in pulse you may get a 7-8% increase in effort.

Hope the above helps,

Paul


Re: heel spurs and pre race nerves

From: Paul Shields
Category: General
Date: 8/19/98
Time: 10:30:04 PM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Raechel,

There was nothing in your post but I can guess from your title that you have heel spurs and often feel nervous just before a race.

Heel Spurs

Heel spurs can be quite painful. A heel spur is a point of extra bone growth on the heel. Plantar Faciitis is inflamation or tearing of the thick fibrous fascia connecting the toes to the heel. It is often a precursor to heel spurs.

They can be caused by a variety of things but over pronation is one of the common causes. Other things include chages in surface, intensity, duration or type of training that you are doing. Eliminating the cause is the best way to treat them. If it is caused by excessive pronation then motion control shoes are essential.

Here is a site with alot more information on the condition..

http://www.clark.net/pub/pribut/heelhtm.html

Pre-race nerves

These are a quite common and especially so if you only race infreqently and only for 'big' events. Here are a few pointers to help deal with them:

- Get there early and make sure you have plenty of time before the race.

- Organise a routine of activities that you do before each race.

- Breath several times deeply into your belly for holding your breath on both the inhale and exhale

- practice relaxation techniques away from the race site and use them on the day.

- talk and jok with friends after you have finished the warm-up but before the race starts.

Hope the above few commenst help,

Regards

Paul


Injury - Pain under shoelaces

From: Bernd Korves
Category: General
Date: 8/19/98
Time: 1:40:09 AM
Remote Name: 147.188.100.198

Comments

Hi there, Since my training went up to about 50+ k/week I started getting problems with my right foot. It is a mild pain on top of my right foot, sort of under my shoe laces, slightly on the inside. Went to a good running shop and the guy said i should change my laces (they could rub on my foot) - which i did. NO GOOD! I thought, and in a way i still think, it has something to do with the fact that i am flat-footed. I used to run in Nike Air Triax and changed to the specially supported once now. It seems to be connected with the muscle that lets the front of the foot touch down smothly once the heel has touched the ground. when it is really bad i sort of let the rest of my foot just bang down, which gives me sore toes after a while.

Has anybody had something similar before?

What can i do (apart from not run)?

Tried RICE but didn't really make a difference. Is there a particular streching for the foot? Do i need to run on grass all the time, or cut my speedwork to zero?

Any help welcome,

Bernd

Re: Injury

From: Paul Shields
Category: General
Date: 8/20/98
Time: 8:42:12 AM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Bernd,

I am not a doctor but can give you a couple pointers that may help.

Firstly you should try and seperate whether it is a soft tissue type injury or whether it is related to your bones. A doctor is the best bet here. If it is a stress fracture of one of the bones in the foot then you will need to rest it for some time.

Soft tissue injuries should respond to RICE and also anti-inflammatory medication (eg asprin). You would also need to remove the cause of the injury to stop it recurring.

As you indicate control of the movement of the foot on impact is important. When buying shoes you should make sure that the sales person either videos you or looks at you while you are running. You can then determine where any motion control corrections are required and the type of shoe or orthotics required.

Gentle stretching and a warm-up can increase blood flow around ligaments and tendons and this can reduce the tramua they suffer when you start running hard. Make sure you slowly warm-up and strech before completing your programmed run for the day.

Regards

Paul


Achilles Tendonitis

From: J.Beasley
Category: Coach
Date: 8/24/98
Time: 6:11:27 AM
Remote Name: 153.34.40.53

Comments

My daughter was recently in attendance of a cross country running camp. She was selected for the first group and was doing hill work she was unaccusotmed to. She hurt her achilles tendon pretty badly and has been asked by her doctor to avoid running for two months. Her cross country season has already begun and it looks like, at this point, she will miss the season. Other people we have contacted say she should try other methods; lighter work outs; icing; elevated heels; etc., but that she does not have to stay completely away from running. The doctor she sees hasn't spent much time with her; five minutes at most during the last two visits and a very short initial diagnosis. I'm just wondering if it's necessary for her to completely avoid running or if she can cross train and lightly work out, paying attention to her body, icing, etc. What do you think and thanks for your input.

Re: Achilles Tendonitis

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 8/26/98
Time: 8:48:55 AM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Hi,

Achilles Tendonitis can be a tricky problem. I have given some advice on this before. See http://www/runcoachdiscus/_disc1/00000076.htm

The basic position is that your daughter should be able to do activities which do not cause pain. If when she runs and the achilles hurts then the doctor is right she will need to stop. So try the other activities suggested and if she is pain free then gradually increase the activities with the foot. When she can run again then increase slowly.

Hope the above helps,

Paul


Marathon schedule for elite runners

From: Dirk
Category: Coach
Date: 8/26/98
Time: 8:32:07 AM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Hi,

I created a Marathon schedule (PB 2:34@6/98, current LR = 12m on WED) and I run 60 miles week! The plan suggested a 28 mile run the WED before the race! Don't you think that that is too long for beeing that close to the race?

Also, I went from 60 to 120 miles in 9 weeks...I'am afraid to get injured!

Dirk

Re: Marathon schedule for elite runners

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 8/26/98
Time: 8:52:16 AM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Dirk,

The program generation part of RunCoach provides a schedule based on general principles and trys to follow this for all levels of runners. The things you mentioned are out of whack with what I would normally suggest. Feel free to alter the program as you see fit. Looking at each issue in turn.

Taper period

For a marathon the ideal taper is between 2 and 4 weeks long. During this period you should not do any long runs. The suggestion by RunCoach that you do such a run the week before should be avoided. I will be re-vamping the taper section in the near future.

Long Run length

This is dependent on your ability and target time. Elite marathon runners regularly do overdistance training. 28 miles is not an uncommon long run distance for an elite marathon runner who is aiming for a sub 2h30m time. For people with lower aspirations the long run distance is reduced although even Galloway recommends overdistance long runs. The minimum long run distance is about 20m

Miles per week

Elite marathon runners regularly exceed 100m in a weeks training. They often do two runs in a day. By all means reduce this mileage if you are not used to these distances. Many people run marathons on less than 60m per week.

Finally, I will be upgrading the program generation system for version 2 and hopefully this will improve this area.

Regards

Paul


Sore Legs

From: Walker Luedtke
Category: Coach
Date: 8/26/98
Time: 8:35:13 AM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Paul,

I have been working out for the past four months running, mountain biking, weightlifting, tennis, swimming and motorcycle racing. My legs are always sore and tired lately. Usually I take one day off a week and don't do anything but the other days I do two or three of the activities.

I used Creatine for awhile but stopped due to weight gain.

I'm 26 and weight 165 pounds and probably don't eat right.

Need some advice

Walker

Re: Sore Legs

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 8/26/98
Time: 8:54:29 AM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Walker,

I am not a doctor but can give you a few tips that may help.

The first thing that it could be is overtraining. This is caused by an accumulation of muscle damage caused by hard training with no periods of time to recover. You should try and have an easy day/ hard day cycle and and easy week/ hard week cycle. You should also try and alternate the muscle groups used in the sports. If you do a sport that uses lower body muscles (eg running) then do an upper body sport next. (eg Upper body weights)

Try taking a few days of complete rest and see if this improves things. If it does then it may be overtraining.

It also could be a sickness or virus. This would need to be diagnosed by a doctor but could be a possiblity.

Another thought is that it could be diet related. When you exersize for long periods of time you deplete your body's glycogen stores. If you don't eat enough carbohydrates and replenish this supply then you will feel lethargic. This feeling is similiar to hitting the wall in a marathon. With training your body learns to operate better on fats and also learns how to spare the use glycogen.

Hope the above helps,

Paul


All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owner. The comments are property of their posters, all the rest Đ 2008 by Online Sports Coaching
This web site was made with PostNuke, a web portal system written in PHP. PostNuke is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL license.
You can syndicate our news using the file backend.php