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1998 Forum Archive - Training B

RunCoach Forums 1998 Archive - Training B

Threshold run pace and Interval rest periods

From: Peter Clark
Category: Coach
Date: 4/5/98
Time: 12:49:26 AM
Remote Name: 203.59.24.11

Comments

Paul,

I have two questions for now:

1) When you show a tempo/threshold run you say build slowly, run fast ,finish slow. I was wondering about the pace you indicate and if it was the average pace for the distance ( which it appears to be based on the time and distance) or the pace of the fast part of the run.

2)When you are doing intervals the rest time seems longer than I'm used to. Can you let me know the purpose of the longer rest, why it is better than a shorter recovery period in marathon training and what system you are working on. V02 max?

Thanks again.

Peter

Re: Threshold run pace and Interval rest periods

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 4/5/98
Time: 12:53:45 AM
Remote Name: 203.59.24.11

Comments

Peter,

Threshold or Tempo Runs

These runs are meant to be run at close to race pace but at less distance than your goal race. They are designed to be near to your anaerobic threshold and train your body into increasing this as a percentage of your VO2max. As you state, the pace in RunCoach includes the warmup and cool down. The pace of the 'fast' part of the run should be near your 'current ability' pace at the start of the training plan and decrease during the plan till it is close to your race pace in the final weeks. Typically this pace will be around 30secs per mile faster than the average pace given by RunCoach.

Interval Rest Times

Intervals can be varied widely with many purposes. Pace, distance and rest are the main variables. Longer intervals(800m,1k,1m) are used by RunCoach for the longer distance goals(eg Marathon). RunCoach uses the intervals, amongst other things, to increase VO2max. It does this by operating at a pace at and above 100% VO2max velocity. As you decrease the rest time you become less able to do the intervals at the pace and number required to achieve your goal time. If you can achieve the pace and number targets with shorter rest then it may indicate that your goal may not be challenging enough. It is only one indicator so it's best to get a few other indicators before adjusting your goal mid plan.

Other training methods use intervals to train aerobic endurance. These are done at a slower pace with less rest intervals. RunCoach uses tempo/threshold runs for the same thing. Swap a tempo run for these type of intervals if you want.

Hope the above helps.

Regards

Paul


Race day nutrition help

From: Brian Carpenter
Category: General
Date: 4/5/98
Time: 1:38:19 AM
Remote Name: 207.173.180.75

Comments

18 year-old 4:24 (PB) 1600, last month of high school season.

Re: Race day nutrition help

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 4/6/98
Time: 12:41:07 AM
Remote Name: 203.59.24.11

Comments

Brian,

Thee are many diets and many many nutrition fads. You will find that there is no single answer that fits everybody. The best way is to try a few things and see what works best for you. I will give a bit of specific advice in the following paragraph but be sure to try these suggestions before raceday. Say for example on a hard interval session, threshold run or race simulation. You will need to decide what works for you before the critical day.

If the race is in the morning and the race is short (say below 15km) then some people don't eat at all. For a 1 mile event this is a perfectly fine strategy. If the race is set for the afternoon then you should eat easily digestible carbohydrates(bread, cornflakes jam, sugar etc) at least 2-3 hours before the race starts. If you eat within 1 hour of the race then insulin will still be present in the blood stream. For longer races(above 15km) many people eat to replenish liver glycogen which will have depleted during the night. The food in this case is still carbohydrate based unless you can eat 4-5 hours before the event, when fats may be useful.

If you want advice on specific foods I would be happy to help.

Regards

Paul

Re: Race day nutrition help

From: Brian Carpenter
Category: General
Date: 4/6/98
Time: 4:44:40 AM
Remote Name: 207.173.180.51

Comments

Thank you very much for the advice. I failed to mention that my concern is rather recent in my career. I don't know if my growth and age are changing my needs or if I just can't find the right combination for high energy. I have had my blood count checked for iron and that is OK. Last Friday I was on a good pace in a big invitational, running second with splits of 65, 2:15, and 3:23, then I finished in 4:39 and was out of gas completely. This is the third or fourth time that has happened. My coach, Bill Bakley, thinks it may be nutrition, but that wasn't a problem last spring when I won the Regionals. I want to get below 4:20 by May 15 if possible. Do you think it is important to eat well about 3 to 4 hours before the race? I worry that it may make me feel sluggish. Thanks again for your help.

Re: Most likely Iron Deficiency

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 4/6/98
Time: 4:44:44 AM
Remote Name: 207.173.180.51

Comments

Brian

You could consider that one of the causes could be iron deficiency

Regards

Paul

Re: Race day nutrition help

From: Brian Carpenter
Category: General
Date: 4/7/98
Time: 5:24:13 AM
Remote Name: 207.173.180.50

Comments

Thank you very much for your time and help, we are trying everything possible this week. I get new blood results on Tuesday and will try to eat the way I should. We have Tempe relays qualifying on Thursday afternoon and finals in Sun Devil Stadium Saturday night. Sincerely, Brian P.S.- I have an appointment at the Air Force Academy next year and will be running for Coach Stanforth and Coach Lindeman.

Re: Race day nutrition help

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 4/8/98
Time: 11:52:44 PM
Remote Name: 203.12.191.53

Comments

Brian,

Hope you do well. Let us know how you go. If things don't work out let us know a bit more about your training.

All the best,

Paul


Torn calf muscle (soleus)

From: Dee
Category: Coach
Date: 4/10/98
Time: 12:55:11 PM
Remote Name: 194.42.240.2

Comments

Friday 20th March 1998 i was participating in a boxercise class and 50 minutes into the class whilst doing on-the-spot high knee sprints i injured my left calf. At first i thought it was a pulled muscle. But later it was revealed the soleus torn. Since then i have not run. Prior to my injury i had run three races, 25k, half marathon(1:21:00) and 10k(39:23) and was looking in good form for the London marathon on Sunday 26th April. My main concern was to recover from the injury which i think i have. I had a fitness test on a treadmill today consisting of 1 mile jog at 5mph for 2 laps and 6mph for 2 laps. Immediately after i went straight onto a bike and 10 mins hill profile program covering 4.2k. Straight off and onto treadmill to run 10 mins profile at 6mph. No reactions from the calf. I will continue to see a physio for a massage on the calf and continue with the stretchs. I would like to run the London marathon but its only 16 days away. Having missed 3 weekes i don`t know what to do. Maybe you can shed some light on the matter. Would you if you were in my place ?

Re: Torn calf muscle (soleus)

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 4/13/98
Time: 11:10:12 AM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Dee,

Injuries are the worst thing when you are training for an event, and especially so when they occur close to the actual day. Although your doctor/physio will have told you it is important to take it slowly when healing a torn muscle. You should only gradually increase your running and stretching (gradually), range of motion exersizes and massage (scar tissue removal) can help. If you have been careful the 4-5 weeks is the minimum time for a tear to heal.

Depending on your training it might be possible to run the marathon. If your long-run build-up prior to the injury involved runs over 20 miles then there is some hope. You may need to switch your goal time as well to avoid disappointment or injury. During the next couple of weeks gradually increase the distance constantly looking for any twinges from the calf. Don't do any interval or fast work and mainly focus on lengthening the time on your longest run. If all seems in order do a short 3-4 day taper and do the marathon, starting slow and only building speed if you are feeling fine.

Hope the above helps,

Paul


400 meters

From: Ty Ledbetter
Category: General
Date: 5/3/98
Time: 3:07:58 PM
Remote Name: 166.102.179.109

Comments

I am in the eigth grade in Arkansas in the United States and I run a 55.2 400 meter dash, and I was wondering If anyone has any training info on it for me. If you do please email me at tyledbetter@mailcity.com

Thank You

Ty Ledbetter

Comments

Ty,

Hi. Good time in the 400m. RunCoach is not specifically designed to help with the shorter distance track events although the general principles involved mean than any plan developed could well be useful.

Here are a few track and field sites that provide training information:

- http://www.pnc.com.au/~stevebn/sydney~3.htm (Sydney Olympics Track and Field Training Site)

- http://www.trackonline.com/ (Track and Field Online)

- http://www.pnc.com.au/~stevebn/plan.htm (Training for 400m/800m an alternative plan)

- http://www.usatf.org/ (USA Track and Field)

There are many others but the above are a good start.

All the best,

Paul

Re: 400 meters

From: Corbin Mozisek, East Bernard Texas
Category: General
Date: 2/23/99
Time: 11:07:37 AM
Remote Name: 209.163.161.113

Comments

I run a 48.5 quater. at the end of every workout, start running 300s. If you finish them in under 42 seconds, stop. If you run it slower than 42, keep running around to where you started the 300. Keep running until you can't run a 300 under 42 anymore, than run 2 hard 400s. The key to running a good 400 is running a GREAT 300.

Good Luck.


Frustrated Calf Muscle Cramper

From: Peter Miller
Category: Coach
Date: 5/18/98
Time: 6:16:11 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Dear Paul

I have a query to ask you regarding Marathon running . I ran my 18th marathon today at Bunbury in Western Australia ( 17.May.98) and suffered extreme calf muscle cramp from the 32 km mark. Up until then I was feeling very good and on a sub 3:30 hour target. After 32 km I started to cramp up extremely bad and had to walk/run the remaining the 10km.

I have been on a very low fat diet for the last 3 months and wonder if this has any thing to do with my problem. Could you please tell me of all related problems to the above as I wish to run the Perth Marathon in about 6 weeks ( 5 July 1998 ).

Any help would be greatly appreciated .

Regards

Peter

Re: Frustrated Calf Muscle Cramper

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 5/18/98
Time: 6:21:48 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Peter,

Cramping is caused by electrolyte imbalances across the cell walls in muscles. The quickest and easiest solution is to try and avoid these imbalances before they occur. I have found in 95% of cases drinking water and increasing the fluid in your body will stop cramps dead in their tracks. The trick is to keep hydrated throughout the marathon and at the first sign of any twinges in your calf muscles start drinking. If you still get them then drink plenty of water, stretch the muscle to try and stop it contracting, and also slowly massage out any knotted parts.

There are several other factors that can play a role. After fluid intake, the most important factor in preventing exersize induced cramping is your diet. Electolyte deficiency's such as sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium etc can be a factor. The most important of these, in my experience, are sodium and potassium. It is hard to have too little sodium as it is in almost every processed food that we eat. If however your diet contains little processed foods then you may need to take extra salt. Potassium defficiency is a more likely culprit. Bananas are a good source of potassium.

Finally it is always useful to talk with a doctor or nutritionist about these things.

Hope the above helps,

Paul

Re: Frustrated Calf Muscle Cramper

From: Culgaith@aol.com
Category: General
Date: 1/23/99
Time: 12:38:30 PM
Remote Name: 152.163.204.203

Comments

I only cramp in my right calf, what could the reason be, the type of footwear is irrelevant as it is only the one calf.


In stitches

From: Cori
Category: General
Date: 5/29/98
Time: 2:38:52 AM
Remote Name: 207.164.168.16

Comments

Dear Paul,

I'm a relatively new runner. Lately I have been experiencing a painful abdominal stitch durring my runs. I have tried extra stretching before hand. Stoping and stretch durring. Nothing seems to help. I simpling run with it.

What can I do?

Re: In stitches

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 5/29/98
Time: 11:47:44 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Cori,

Side Stitch can be a terribly frustrating problem. Here are some brief guidelines to help you out.

They are usually caused by cramps in your diaphragm, gas build-up in the intestines or food in the stomach. Stitches mostly occur during hard runs or races.

When you get a stitch on your right side slow down for a minute or so and breathe out hard when your left foot strikes the ground. If the stitch is on your left, exhale hard when your right foot hits. If this doesn't work, try slow, deep breathes expanding your lungs into your stomach cavity or run with your hands on top of your head, elbows back inhaling deeply from your belly.

Something else that works for a few people is to make a fist and push it under your ribcage, press the fist with your free arm and bend your body over at right angles. Run like this for a few steps. This stretches the diaphragm, and most stitches are caused by a spasm of the diaphragm. If none of these methods work, stop and walk until the pain stops.

Also, in case it is caused by food, try not to eat before you run.

Hope the above helps,

Paul


Hills (strength training)

From: Bernd
Category: General
Date: 6/8/98
Time: 8:49:11 PM
Remote Name: 147.188.100.198

Comments

I'm supposed to switch to strength training now. When it says 11 hills @ 85% with 10min WU and 10min CD for a 10k session, does that mean:

A 52min session minus 20min CU & CD equals 32min.

Divide this by 11 = app. 3 min.

This is of course up and down the hill, but is it 90 sec up and 90 sec down. And is the hill supposed to be as steep as stairs, or is a little slope enough?

I'll be using my HRM so am I supposed to reach 85% of my training effort at the end of the uphill or fairly early?

So many questions........will they be answered?

Bernd

Re: Hills (strength training)

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 6/9/98
Time: 12:29:09 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Bernd,

Hope everything is going fine. Yes your questions will be answered!

You are in the second phase of a four phase periodized training program. This strength training phase will build up your leg muscle strength before turning this into speed during the next phase. In fact research has shown that muscle fibre recruitment and development during hill sessions is almost identical to speed sessions at the same effort.

The hill you select for hill training is not that important and is more dependent on what you have available nearby. If you could ideally choose then about a 15% incline which takes you 2 minutes or more to go up would be the best. Do not worry if you have only smaller hills just modify the session to cope.

Once you have found your hill then the number of repeats is determined by subtracting the the warm-up and cool-down from the total time then dividing the remaining time by how long it takes you to do go up the hill and down. In your example with 32 minutes left, a hill that took 5 minutes for the loop would be repeated 6 or 7 times rather than the suggested 11.

Go up the hill quite hard. The exact effort is not important rather you should try and do the last repeat in about the same time as the first. Often this means going easy on the first few and gradually building effort. The 85% figure is an indication of the type of effort required rather then a fixed percent that should be strictly adherred to. It will vary during the climb and represents an averageish figure rather than the final value.

The downhills should be quite easy. It is often possible to injure yourself going downhill because of the eccentric muscle action (expands whilst trying to contract).

For variations some people like to bound up the hills with exagerated high leg movement. Also trying swapping some of the hill repeat session for an undulating run through some hilly country. In these runs practise flowing down the hills rather than trying to stop yourself on each downhill footfall.

Regards

Paul


Marathon Program

From: Peter Clark
Category: Coach
Date: 6/10/98
Time: 10:39:16 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Hi Paul,

You said you would provide more specific coaching advice so I'm taking you up on your offer. I'm about one month into the marathon program that you'll find in the RBK file attached to this email. You'll notice that the mileage has been low recently but that is because I took a side trip into triathlon. Since I've completed that today its time to get back on the running program although I still will be doing some swimming and biking along the way (but no triathlon races).

I've recorded my bike and swim workouts in the comments section of the "coach", "plan a program", "review program" report if you need to see what else I've been doing. I did it this way rather than as a workout as the bike & swim mileage really impacts the plan actual graphs etc as well as the monthly pace figures.

We did a long run of 28k last Sunday and although slower than planned as we were running as a group it felt really easy and no sore legs the next day. 

I generally use a heart rate monitor but it does not give "time in the zone" or averages etc.

Here's some questions for you:

There  is a 1/2 marathon race in early August. How do you think this should be run? At projected marathon pace? Faster?

When I take my resting heart rate in the morning it is often significantly higher than it is if I take it in late afternoon while resting. The lowest  rate recorded in the morning is generally 46 while I've seen rates as low as 35 to 39 in the afternoon. Any ideas?

Do you think I'm on track even with the lower recent mileage? Any changes to the program?

Thanks for your help!

Peter

Re: Marathon Program

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 6/10/98
Time: 10:46:24 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Peter,

Looks like you are going well. Sorry about the recording of activities other than running. The database has been designed to handle other sports but I have not implemented a user friendly front-end yet. This is on the to-do list. I also noticed that you have alot of people registered and it takes sometime to fill the drop-down box when you select it. I will try and speed that up.

Long runs are the most important part of a marathon training plan. The fact that you have done a 28k run already bodes well for the rest of the program. Intially it is best to just go for the distance and not to worry how slow you are going. Later on you should try and up the pace to somewhere between an easy run and a threshold run. The next beta of RunCoach has pulse recommendations built into the training programs. This will give an additional piece of guidance together with the pace. (70% give or take is about the right level for a long run)

Looking at your three questions

- The half marathon should be run somewhat faster than the marathon pace. It is far enough away from the marathon that you have time to recover. Try and do a good race but don't worry if it is not a PB as you are aiming for the marathon. Get RunCoach to suggest a target time and take a minute or two off that.

- The actual level of the resting (or basal) pulse is not too critical. The major focus is to watch for variations from the trend. eg a jump of 10-20% could indicate overtraining, or sickness. The recommendation is to measure it at the same time every day. It doesn't matter if it is morning, lunch or evening just do it at similiar a time. Most people use morning. My pulse also drops in the afternoons!

- The program looks fine. I wouldn't worry about it at this early stage. Focus on having fun and completing those long runs. Forget about speed but use an occasional race to keep your leg turnover. You are in the base phase at present and have the strength and speed phases to go. During the base phase the more k's the better assuming you avoid injury. Each 2nd week is an easy week so use it to recover for the next and don't try and push it during these 'easy' weeks.

You might also look at this database article which also talks about marathon training - http://www.sportscoach.com.au/runcoachdiscus/_disc1/00000056.htm

Hope the above helps,

Paul

Re: Thanks and 'too many members registered?'

From: Peter Clark
Category: General
Date: 6/10/98
Time: 10:49:21 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Paul,

Thanks for your comments I appreciate it.

When you say I have a lot of people "registered" does this mean I'm using your program inappropriately? I belong to a running club and have used Runcoach to design programs for members. Should each person be paying the registration fee?

Thanks

Peter

Re: too many members registered?

From: Paul Shields
Category: General
Date: 6/10/98
Time: 10:51:29 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Peter,

No you are not using the program inappropriately. Feel free to include as many people as you like. I just want to make the drop down box quicker for you:-)

If people want their own personal copy then a registration fee would be appropriate.

Regards

Paul


How periodized are RunCoach programs

From: Joe Rosenfels
Category: Coach
Date: 6/10/98
Time: 10:57:56 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Paul,

I am trialing your run coach program and have a question for you. When preparing a goal program the suggested program does not seem to have any easy weeks ie no micro cycles within a macro cycle. I am trying to improve my 5km time and find it sets up a 4 week rountine with each week slightly longer than the last and the easy runs getting faster. Any comments?

Also, what heart rate would you suggest for your easy runs ie 70% as I find it hard to run at a nominated pace ie hills, no km markers etc.

Regards,

Joe

Re: How periodized are RunCoach programs

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 6/10/98
Time: 11:05:02 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Joe,

RunCoach has both a 'periodized' and 'complex' training programs built in. If it has designed a 'complex' program then there are no macro cycles and the micro cycles are of 7 days. The 'periodized' programs have macro cycles of base, strength, speed and taper, called phases. These macro cycles vary in length depending on the number of weeks in the training program and the goal distance. The micro cycles are still 7 days. Superimposed on all of this is a hard week/easy week cycle and a hard day/easy day cycle.

The above training regime is suitable for the vast majority of people. There are, of course, many variations and fine tuning could be done to better focus on an individuals strength and weaknesses. This however would require more information than RunCoach has :-)

If you choose a goal distance that requires you to increase your mileage and this mileage level is a long way from your current level, or you choose a goal pace that is a long way from your current ability then RunCoach will modify the above training patterns to try and get you into condition for the event. (It may also warn you that the goal may be difficult to achieve). These modifications may stretch the easy weeks into harder than what it would normally do. This is probably what is happening with your program.

The next beta of RunCoach has heart rate training recommendations built into it. You may like to look at the following discussion database article which outlines some recommendations. http://www.sportscoach.com.au/runcoachdiscus/_disc1/0000000e.htm

For an easy run about 65% plus minus about 5 is fine or 70% if you use a straight percentage.

Hope the above helps,

Paul


Injury

From: Allan Natta
Category: General
Date: 6/14/98
Time: 12:35:32 PM
Remote Name: 202.27.184.69

Comments

After running 14km about 1 week ago, I developed a pain in my left foot, It's probaly cm above the ankle at the back. If their is any pressure down on it, it tends to be very sore. HELP,it is very frustrating because it not going away in a hurry. Can some one tell me if I have ripped a muscle

Re: Probably Achilles Tendinitis

From: Paul Shields
Category: General
Date: 6/16/98
Time: 12:25:53 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Allan,

I am not a doctor but can maybe give you a few pointers. From your description it sounds like you have Achilles Tendinitis. This can be extremely painful and the worst part about is that you should probably stop running until it heals.

You may care to look at a variety of medical sites on the Web which can provide some help. An example of one is as follows: http://www.runnersworld.com/injuries/achilles.html

In summary it can be caused by over training, hill running, poor shoes or over pronation. Immediate treatment is RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation). Anti inflammatory medication (eg asprin) can also help. You should stop running until the pain disappears then gradually start again remembering to stretch. For the long term you should identify the cause (eg running shoes, or calf muscle strength etc) then rectify or eliminate the causative factors. (eg replace running shoes, or strengthen calf muscles etc)

Inflammed Achilles Tendons are frustrating, I hope you can get over it soon.

All the best,

Paul


New Runner and pain in the legs

From: Angela Dixon
Category: Coach
Date: 6/16/98
Time: 12:46:28 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Hello!

I don't know if anybody can help me or not, but it's worth a shot!

I am a 27 year old female who hasn't excersized in a looong time. I recently, (3 days ago!) began running. 1st walking fast, then running,and stopping and running. I do 2 miles a night. I bought new running shoes, and now the fronts of my legs are very very sore! I am VERY motivated at this time to continue this, so I can lose weight! About 30 over...ugh.

I don't know what to do, I DONT want to stop!!! Can anybody recommend anything?

Thank you.

Sincerely,

Angela

Re: Probably Shin Splints

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 6/16/98
Time: 12:54:05 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Angela,

It is good that you are running. It is a great pastime. The main thing when you are starting out is to take it easy and only increase the distance/time that you are running gradually. It is often easy with a new activity to get too keen and do too much too soon :-)

Starting off with alternating with run/walk cycles is a good way to go. The main thing is to slowly build up the time on your legs. Don't feel that you must try and run the whole time. Keep going with run/walk regime till you are up too 45 mins or so, then start trying to increase the length of the run parts. Soon you will be running the whole way.

I am not a doctor but the soreness in the fronts of your legs are probably shin splints. (I guess they hurt in the lower legs). This can often be caused by a change in running surface, worn-out running shoes or sometimes new shoes. Beginning runners are often prone to them because their leg muscles start being used in ne ways. Depending on how it is caused, the usual remedy is to try and eliminate the offending activity.

You may like to look at one of the many medical sites on the net. There are several which deal with Shin Splints. An example is: http://www.runnersworld.com/injuries/shinspln.html

Treatment. RICE(wait 10 mins), no hills especially down hill, no speedwork

Prevention. strengthen muscles around shins, orthotics, leg length differences, avoid banked or hard surfaces.

Medically there are several possible causes of shin splints. With a new runner the most common cause is "anterior compartment syndrome". This will usually improve after your leg muscles strengthen. If there is no improvement after a week or so then complete rest is recommended.

Hope the above helps,

Paul

Re: Thanks and Which is harder asphalt or concrete?

From: Angela Dixon
Category: General
Date: 6/16/98
Time: 12:56:56 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Hello!

Thank you so much for your suggestions.

It sounds like I'm doing everything right so far! I go for about 45min-1hour, and last night when I got home, I did the Rice theory...Rest, Ice, Compression, and elevation, is that right? Anyway, I did ice the lower fronts of my legs, and today, they are much less sore. Also, I took Ibuprofen when I got home, for an anti-inflamatory. What do you think about icing before running?

I just can't imagine running the whole way at all! The running and walking switch off is working out well at this point.

Is concrete worse for running on than asphalt? I tried to run in the park down from my house, but it's all concrete, and I don't want to aggravate the shin splints. Hopefully, they will go away soon.

Well, I'm sorry I asked so many more questions! I know you must be very busy.

Thank you again!

Angela

Re: Concrete is harder

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 6/16/98
Time: 12:59:45 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Angela,

Sounds like you are going fine. Remember only so slowly increase the running periods, and before you know it you will be running the whole time.

I don't believe in RICE before you exersize but straight after is good.

Concrete is harder than ashphalt but be careful running on ashphalt as there is usually other traffic.

Keep doing what you are doing and the pain should decrease. If is doesn't then let me know.

Regards

Paul

Re: Concrete is harder

From: Mike Conley
Category: General
Date: 6/18/98
Time: 8:46:08 AM
Remote Name: 206.29.116.200

Comments

Angela, The late Dr. Sheehan conceived of the "magic six" exercises to prevent runner's related injuries. Check out http://www.clark.net/pub/pribut/stayout.html. There is a discription of each of the exercises The "Shin Splinter" is a good exercise and has done me world's of good. Hanging weights over my toes didn't work well for me, so here what I do.

1. Lay face down in your bed with your feet just over the edge.

2. Pull your toes "up" into the mattress (the mattress provides the resistance) and hold for about 10 second.

3. repeat about 10 times.

While you are holding, you should feel alittle "burning" (not painful) sensation. I do the exercise right before I good to sleep.

I hope this helps. Welcome to the runners world. Paul is right It's a great life style and actually a lot of fun.

Good Luck!!!

Mike

Re: It's getting easier

From: Angela Dixon
Category: Coach
Date: 6/18/98
Time: 10:45:37 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Hi there!

Thanks for your help, I'm still keeping it up. It's only been 2 weeks, and the pain from the shin splints is basically gone! I try to run on dirt 1st, then asphalt, then the cement sidewalk, whatever is available in that order.

Still doing about 2 miles per night. I'm still walking then running then walking. And just like you said, the running is becoming easier and easier!

Thank you so much for all of your help!

Angela


Help for a race and some health tips

From: Teri Koressel
Category: Coach
Date: 6/17/98
Time: 4:41:19 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Hi Paul,

I run about 3 miles a day and I will be running a 5 mile race in 6 days.

I have run a couple of races last year and finished in the back half. This year i've taken it more seriously. I also have been trying to quit smoking and have done so on the patch but got into the habit of having 2 or 3 at night. This week i'm stopping that completley .When I run I feel like i'm going to puke, is that from just the couple of cigerettes I have at night?

I also get a stitch in my side although its gotten better how do I remedy that? I usually drink some wine at night which i'm stopping this week. Has that been slowing me down? I ran 6 miles last week and didn't drink any wine the night before. Is that why I had more energy?

The race is in 6 days how should I train?

Teri

Re: Help for a race and some health tips

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 6/17/98
Time: 4:45:20 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Teri,

It is good that you are running. It can often help you to quit smoking.

The first thing you should do (if you haven't already) is have a look at the 'Raceday and the week before' section on the RunCoach Tips site. (http://www.sportscoach.com.au/contents.htm). This will provide some help over the next few days. I will try and give some specific guidance below.

Firstly, I am not a doctor, but if you are still on the patches and have started smoking a few then your nicotine levels could be well over the levels you were before you were on the patches. It is best (although difficult) to avoid smoking whilst on the patches. Try a larger patch instead.

I am not sure what is causing your puking but the cirarettes certainly would not help. It could well be the high nicotine levels caused by the patches and smokes. It could also be your diet. You should try and avoid eating for an hour before you go for your run. The alchohol the night before shouldn't worry you too much as long as it is only a glass or two. In general both the wine and cigarettes both don't help your running but the cigarettes are by far the worse.

Side stitch can be caused by a variety of things. Have a look at this discussion database article for methods of dealing with it (http://www.sportscoach.com.au/runcoachdiscus/_disc1/0000005c.htm)

During the next few days try and run less than you have been. Don't run for a couple of days before, although a light 5-10 min jog may be good the day before. Relax, get to race early, start slowly and build to a speed to you are comfortable and above all have fun.

All the best,

Paul


calf cramps

From: manuel
Category: General
Date: 6/19/98
Time: 9:30:23 PM
Remote Name: 194.158.111.113

Comments

I, regularly suffer calf cramps in triathlon when I start to run,thenb after 1 mile or so it disappear.Anyone has an idea on

1-what is the reason fr such cramps to appear

2-a way to prevent them

thanks

Manolo

Re: calf cramps

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 6/19/98
Time: 11:13:43 PM
Remote Name: 203.8.222.67

Comments

Manolo,

I am not a doctor but can give you a few things that have helped me. First thing is to have a read on this earlier post on calf cramps http://www.sportscoach.com.au/runcoachdiscus/_disc1/00000058.htm This gives some general information and some ways to prevent them.

The change from biking to running is often the worst in a triathlon. People often get stomach and leg cramping. The calf muscle especially has a smaller range of motion when compared with running. Some specific anti-cramping techniques you can use on a triathlon as as follows:

- drink plenty of water (often we forget to drink on the bike)

- If it is a long ride then take some potassium rich foods (eg bannanas)

- Stretch the calf muscles for the last couple of minutes of the ride and first thing off the bike

- Start slow and build speed on the run

Hope the above helps,

Paul


Runners Knee

From: lexis@ozemail.com.au
Category: Coach
Date: 6/22/98
Time: 11:59:21 PM
Remote Name: 203.8.223.2

Comments

Paul,

If possible, i would very much appreciate some tips on which muscles (and the exercises needed) to strengthen, fix and prevent runners knee. I have had it for 1 year now, and it is really getting to me!!!

Help!!!!

Re: Runners Knee

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 6/23/98
Time: 12:03:20 AM
Remote Name: 203.8.223.2

Comments

Hi,

Runners knee can be very painful. I am not a doctor, but can give you a few pointers. The major symptom is pain in and around the kneecap. It can also be stiff. It is mainly caused by overtraining (too hard, too long or too often), or by muscle imbalance between the hamstrings and quadriceps.

Immediate treatment is RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) if there is any swelling, and also anti-immflamatory medication (eg asprin). Longer term you should stregthen quadriceps (eg stand on a step, and step down keeping the opposite quad tight). Make sure you have good shoes and get your gait checked for pronation.

You might also like to look at these Websites:

http://www.sportscoach.com.au/injury.html#knee

http://www.runnersworld.com/injuries/knee.html

http://www.runnersworld.com/injuries/chondrom.html

All the best,

Paul


Proper breathing pattern

From: John Thorsby - Kissimmee Fl.
Category: Coach
Date: 6/24/98
Time: 3:32:40 AM
Remote Name: 169.139.8.8

Comments

I need some advice or guidance - about breathing. Currently I inhale on my left footstrike and exhale on the next left strike. I read an article by Coach Jack Daniels and his advice was not easy for me to understand. I've found that I'm breathing quite fast and getting dry-mouth after about 20 to 25 minutes. I don't get dizzy from hyperventilation - but I'm concerned that it might start. I have also tried a pattern where I inhale on the left and begin to exhale on the 2nd right footstrike. It seems to work ok, but it's too complicated to keep up for long. My goal is to keep things as simple as possible.

If anyone has anything to offer that I might consider-I would appreciate it.

jfthorsbt@juno.com

Re: Proper breathing pattern

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 6/24/98
Time: 11:07:33 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

John,

You are not alone in having trouble breathing. Research has shown that up to 50% of us experience abnormally low levels of oxygen in the blood as exersize intensity increases. This leads to increased, ragged and irregular breathing.

There is much advice given about breathing but the best thing is to listen to your body. Don't try and force a pattern and you will find that as the amount of running you do increases it will start becoming easier as you adjust to a natural cadence.

If you feel the need to tinker with your breathing pattern then there are a couple of key things to watch.

- Firstly try and breathe from lower in your body. Some people call it 'belly-breathing'. As you breathe in expand your lower chest first filling to the top.

- Secondly try and find a rythm. There are many different types as you well know. A simple and popular one is, as you suggest, is to exhale on you left foot strike (organs attached to the diaphram are smaller on the left side). But any regular pattern is useful.

You must also look to keeping your posture upright, and chest forward. It also sounds like you are taking shallow breathes so try and breathe more deeply

All of the above may not help, remember the best thing to do is listen to your body, breathe deeply and regularly and over time it will get easier.

All the best,

Paul


Can I Jog?

From: Xu Tao
Category: Coach
Date: 6/29/98
Time: 2:10:13 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Hi,

I am 26 years old and just entered a Japanese company with very high rhythm of work. I work as a salesman of chemical fibres. There is nearly no interval in your 8 hours work and often overtime works. I felt very tired and get some uncomfortable feeling in my left chest . Formerly I sometimes felt this uncomfortableness but not so continuously.I decided to begin to jog to exercise my body.

And actually for the past week I got up at 6:00 am in the morning and go to jog 15 minutes in the nearby park. In my case, can I jog and what is the ideal volume of exercise for a start? Is there a method to calculate suitable volume of exercise?

thanks & regards/xu tao from shanghai china

Re: Can I Jog?

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 6/29/98
Time: 2:13:21 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Xu,

It is good that you are taking up running as it is a great pastime and good for you too! I am not a doctor and you should seek medical advice regarding your pains but I can give you a few tips about starting an exersize program.

One of the most important things is to start gradually and build slowly. Often people are very keen at the beginning and jog too far or too fast. So start with a small amount and only increase the amount slowly. Once you are up to 30 mins or so per jog then don't increase your total weekly distance or time by more than 10% or 5 minutes

Anthor tip is not to be worried about walking for some of the time. Don't feel that you have to jog the whole way. One of the best methods is to try a 5min jog/5 min walk routine. Keep alternating. Start with 10mins then 20 then 30 until you reach about 45mins. Once you can keep the exersize up for this time then gradually decrease the walking time. In no time you will be jogging the whole time.

Also make sure that you have good running shoes. Your body will start to get additional jarring from the pavement pounding so a good pair of shoes will help to avoid injuries. You should also try and run on soft ground if possible (dirt, grass etc not concrete, ashpalt etc).

Try and make your running times a fixed time each day. In this way it will soon become a habit and you will be less likely to miss it. Vary your jogging routes so you can avoid any boredom from running the same place all of the time. Try and get some friends interested and get them to run with you. Watch out for any aches and pains, listen to your body.

Hope that the above few comments help and just remember above all take it easy and have fun.

Regards

Paul

Re: Thanks

From: Xu Tao
Category: Coach
Date: 7/1/98
Time: 10:58:22 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Paul,

I appreciate your quick reply to my question and I will follow your precious advices. Thank you very much for your help, I will keep you informed of my benefits from jogging.

xu tao


PB calculation

From: Burkhard
Category: General
Date: 6/29/98
Time: 9:50:45 PM
Remote Name: 134.106.252.140

Comments

Hi, how can I calculate - not programm-based more like in a rough formula - what future PBs are realistic. I am 53, 1997 PB 10k is 43:40, Marathon 1998 PB is 4:06. What would be a realistic PB for 10k and Marathon? I think there must be some sort of formula based only on age and current PB (neglecting training or - better expressed - assuming maximal training). I nowhere found a article referring to a ration of age and current PB.

Anybody knows? Thank you.

Burkhard

Re: PB calculation

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 6/30/98
Time: 9:49:54 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Burkhard,

There are many different ways to predict future performance. Much research has been done in this area. Recently I upgraded the RunCoach performance prediction system and looked into many of the published methods. In the end I felt none were accurate enough, especially at both ends (sprints and ultras), so I re-wrote the system based on a statistical analysis of PB information. The RunCoach system is quite complex with three different interlocked models.

There are however several simple calculations you can use which will help in this regard. I will provide one for performance predition and one for age retardation. The first generates a PB at one distance from knowing a PB at another

T2 = T1 x (D2/D1)^1.07

Where T1 = known time, T2 = time to predict, D1 = known distance, D2 = distance to predict, ^ = power of.

The formula was developed by Pete Riegel, and appeared in American Scientist, May-June 1981.

It has been established that runners reach their peak between 20 and 30 and there is a noticeable decline after 40. From about 25 there is a 9% decline per decade of VO2max. This can be translated into about the same decline in performance. Training can reduce this decline to around 5% per decade.

So all things being equal your 1998 10k time should be between 0.5% and 1% slower than your 1997 time based on age( say 44m10s). Based on your 1998 Marathon time RunCoach predicts 51m22s for the 10k. The eventual result would be somewhere between these two and would depend mostly on your training.

Hope the above helps,

Paul


When is slow too slow?

From: Burkhard
Category: General
Date: 6/29/98
Time: 9:59:03 PM
Remote Name: 134.106.252.140

Comments

Hi, one of the most famous advices for running long distance is: dont run too fast. That is o.k., but certainly there must be over-exagerating of this advice too. I remember from the time when interval training has been the hype (in the 60ies) that my trainer had some "formula" when calculating my 1st 400 when running 1000m etc. But I forget how he calculated. Any idea? Letīs say: what is the "right" 1st 1000 meter time in a 10k when I aim at 43:00 min. Even better: there might be a formula which tells the "fastest possible" interim time (= one, which if you run it, still let you not have a too high oxygen debt) and the "avoidance (English word?) - interim time = the one which is too slow so that you are not able to balance that during the later stages of the race. Just splitting all 1000m into 10 eqal time paces might sound good on 1st glance but it doesnt adjust to various other aspects: start motivation, competitive aspects during a race etc.

Thank you, Burkhard

Re: When is slow too slow?

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 6/30/98
Time: 9:52:47 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Burkhard,

Race strategy can be a very individual affair. You need to know your own strengths and weaknesses, the same for your fellow runners, the nature of the course, the conditions and finally what goals you have for a race. There is however some general advice that can help most people in developing a pacing approach.

Research has shown that even energy expenditure is the best strategy for achieving your fastest time in a race. So if you are racing on fairly flat terrain, attempting to achieve a PB (not on beating people) and have similar conditions throughout a course then even pacing is the best way to race.

How does this feel in practice? At the start of a race you will have to hold yourself back. It will feel slow and easy. Whilst in the later stages of a race it will feel quite hard and fast and you will be pushing yourself. If you look at your splits they will all be similiar but the feeling is quite different.

The key to doing well with this strategy is good pace judgement and good race time prediction. If either of these are wrong then the race will be less than optimal

Other strategies are appropiate if things are different. For example if you are out to win (or just beat a training partner) and not do a PB then you would do things differently.

Strategies for shorter distances vary as well, and are usually related to winning the race rather than doing a good time. In general the first 400m of 800m races or longer are faster than the middle 400's. Lactate tolerance and buffering varies considerably with individuals so unless you can test people scientifically it would be difficult to predict the fastest and slowest 400m. Most people fine tune their paces by trial and error.

All the best,

Paul


Speed Training For Teenagers

From: R. Marthinsen
Category: Coach
Date: 6/30/98
Time: 11:00:25 AM
Remote Name: 12.68.173.205

Comments

I have 12 and 14 year old sons that are good athletes but are slow and run very heavy footed. Are there any training materials I can get a hold of to help them improve their speed and agility?

Thank you.

Re: Speed Training For Teenagers

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 7/1/98
Time: 10:56:50 AM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

Hi,

With training almost everybody can get faster than they currently are. The ultimate limit however is determined mostly by genetics and determination. The key to improvement is 'to run fast you need to do some fast running'

The first thing to decide is what sort of events do your boys want to improve in. Each distance stresses different energy delivery systems and requires different training. Have a read of the RunCoach training basics article http://www.sportscoach.com.au/sportscoach/basics.html and the intervals article http://www.sportscoach.com.au/sportscoach/intervals.html They will give you some guidelines about improving performance.

Basically the answer is interval sessions. These are repeated short bursts of faster running. They train your body to become better and more efficient at running faster. The length, number, speed and intervening rest are all altered depending on your goal distance.

If your are training for shorter events then some strength training will help whilst if you are training for middle to longer distance events then 'threshold training' will also help to improve speed. (see Training Basics article)

Enter your boys PB's into RunCoach then 'Plan a Program'. Make sure that the speed sessions are set at 2 and the click the 'Plan' button. The program developed should have some interval sessions built in.

All the best,

Paul


pulse target

From: George Moxley
Category: General
Date: 6/30/98
Time: 11:48:33 PM
Remote Name: 207.172.61.54

Comments

I have been running steadily again for about 3 years and had formerly been up to, say, 18-23 miles per week 9 months ago, usually 9-10 minutes per mile. I developed plantar fasciitis, and after nursing it along for several months, I had to take 6 weeks off starting 5 months ago to recover (I did Nordik Trak then).

I started a program aimed to achieve 5 mile run in 42.5 minutes over 12 weeks two weeks ago. As part of this, I started interval training. This week, the interval was 10minWU, 1x1600m@8m01s,r11m30s,10minCD (I did not fully understand the r11m30s with a single interval, so I ignored it). The target pulse is 161-171, but I achieved about 136 after an 8-minute mile (I am 48 years old). What does this mean about my conditioning?

Re: pulse target

From: Paul Shields
Category: Coach
Date: 7/1/98
Time: 1:35:13 PM
Remote Name: 203.38.32.115

Comments

George,

Pulse training can be a curse or a blessing. I mainly use them for making sure people take it easy on 'easy' days. (Set the high alarm and slow down when it goes off.) I will try and help out.

The heart rate zones(HRZ) are dependent on both your resting pulse and your maximum pulse. If you don't know these then RunCoach will use predictions based on population averages. These can be out by as much as 10-15% Your HRZ of 161-171 suggests you were using the age predicted maximum. This may be too high and so give you a higher zone. If you get a chance you should check it.

As you know this range is only for the 'work' part of an interval session. During the mile it should rise to within this zone near the end of the run. With only a single interval it is sometimes difficult to reach the required intensity. The single interval has been programmed probably because RunCoach doesn't want you doing too much work this early in the schedule. For shorter events these longish intervals normally only have a low probabliity of appearing. Please feel free to redesign the RunCoach generated program until you are happy with it. (ie shorter intervals but more of them)

Hope that the above helps

Paul


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